InaSAFE

InaSAFE help 4.4.0

Contents

2. Overview

2.1. Disclaimer

2.2. Limitations and License

3. Glossary of terms

3.1. Basic concepts

3.2. Gender

3.3. Demographics

3.4. Vulnerability

3.5. Minimum needs

3.6. Data representation

3.7. Productivity

4. Core functionality and tools

4.1. The InaSAFE Dock

4.2. InaSAFE Reports

4.3. Managing analysis extents with the extents selector

4.4. InaSAFE Options

4.5. The Batch Runner

4.6. The OpenStreetmap Downloader

4.7. The PetaBencana Downloader

4.8. The Shakemap Converter

4.9. The Multi Buffer Tool

4.10. The Field Mapping Tool

4.10.1. Exposure Groups

4.10.1.1. Age Count

4.10.1.2. Gender Count

4.10.1.3. Age Vulnerability Count

4.10.1.4. Gender Vulnerability Count

4.10.1.5. Disabled Vulnerability Count

4.10.2. Aggregation Groups

4.10.2.1. Age Ratio

4.10.2.2. Gender Ratio

4.10.2.3. Age Vulnerability Ratio

4.10.2.4. Gender Vulnerability Ratio

4.10.2.5. Disability Vulnerability Ratio

4.11. Minimum Needs

4.11.1. The minimum needs tool

4.11.2. The minimum needs manager

5. Analysis steps

5.1. Analysis internal process

5.2. Progress reporting steps

5.2.1. Analysis initialisation

5.2.2. Data store creation

5.2.3. Pre processing

5.2.4. Hazard preparation

5.2.5. Exposure preparation

5.2.6. Aggregation preparation

5.2.7. Aggregate hazard preparation

5.2.8. Combine aggregate hazard and exposure

5.2.9. Post processing

5.2.10. Summary calculation

5.2.11. Profiling

6. Hazard Concepts

6.1. Scenario

6.1.1. Single event

6.1.2. Multiple event

6.2. Hazards

6.2.1. Flood

6.2.2. Flood wet/dry classes

6.2.3. Flood classes

6.2.4. Generic classes

6.2.5. Tsunami

6.2.6. Tsunami classes

6.2.7. Tsunami population classes

6.2.8. Tsunami classes ITB

6.2.9. Tsunami population classes ITB

6.2.10. Earthquake

6.2.11. Generic classes

6.2.12. Earthquake MMI scale

6.2.13. Volcano

6.2.14. Volcano classes

6.2.15. Generic classes

6.2.16. Volcanic ash

6.2.17. Ash classes

6.2.18. Generic classes

6.2.19. Cyclone

6.2.20. Cyclone classes (AU - BOM)

6.2.21. Hurricane classes (SSHWS)

6.2.22. Generic classes

6.2.23. Generic Hazard

6.2.24. Generic classes

6.2.25. Dam Break

6.2.26. Inundation classes

6.2.27. Generic classes

7. Exposure Concepts

7.1. Exposure

7.1.1. Land cover

7.1.2. Generic Landcover Classification

7.1.3. Badan Geologi Landcover Classification

7.1.4. Generic Data-driven Classification

7.1.5. Population

7.1.6. Roads

7.1.7. Generic Road Classification

7.1.8. Generic Data-driven Classification

7.1.9. Places

7.1.10. Generic Place Classification

7.1.11. Generic Data-driven Classification

7.1.12. Structures

7.1.13. Generic Structure Classification

7.1.14. Generic Data-driven Classification

8. InaSAFE Defaults

9. Fields

9.1. Input dataset fields

9.1.1. Exposure fields

9.1.2. Hazard fields

9.1.3. Aggregation fields

9.2. Output dataset fields

9.2.1. Impact fields

9.2.2. Aggregate hazard fields

9.2.3. Aggregation summary fields

9.2.4. Exposure summary table fields

9.2.5. Analysis fields

10. Layer Geometry Types

10.1. Vector

10.1.1. Point

10.1.2. Line

10.1.3. Polygon

10.2. Raster

10.2.1. Raster

11. Layer Modes

11.1. Data type

11.1.1. Continuous

11.1.2. Classified

12. Layer Purposes

12.1. Hazard

12.2. Exposure

12.3. Aggregation

12.4. Impact Analysis

12.5. Hazard Aggregation Summary

12.6. Aggregation Summary

12.7. Exposure Summary Table

12.8. Analysis Log

13. All Units

14. Post Processors

14.1. Post Processor Input Types

14.2. Post Processor Input Values

14.3. Post Processor Process Types

14.4. Post Processors

15. Reporting

15.1. Overview

15.2. QGIS Expressions

15.3. Composer Elements

16. Developer Guide

Overview

Disclaimer

InaSAFE has been jointly developed by the Indonesian Government-BNPB, the Australian Government, the World Bank-GFDRR and independent contributors. These agencies and the individual software developers of InaSAFE take no responsibility for the correctness of outputs from InaSAFE or decisions derived as a consequence.

Limitations and License

Glossary of terms

Basic concepts

Term Description
Analysis

An analysis from the point of view of using InaSAFE is the process whereby a hazard layer, an exposure layer and an optional aggregation layer are used to determine the potential impact of the hazard data on the exposure. The analysis results are grouped by region (as defined in the aggregation layer).

In InaSAFE the analysis process commences with a preparation phase where each input layer is pre-processed to ensure that it is in a consistent state. The hazard and aggregation are reprojected to the same coordinate reference system of the exposure dataset. Any data that is not within the selected aggregation areas is removed. Note that any modifications made are done on copies of the original data - the original data are not modified in any way.

Any continuous datasets are reclassified into classfied (also sometimes referred to as categorical) datasets.

The aggregation layer and the hazard are combined using a GIS union operation and then each exposure within these areas is counted to arrive at a total number, length or area of exposure features per aggregation area. These processes are defined in more detail below. After the primary GIS processing has been carried out, one or more post-processors are applied to the resulting datasets in order to compute statistics like the breakdown of buildings or the area of each land use type in the affected areas.

The final part of the analysis process is report generation whereby InaSAFE generates various tables and cartographic products to represent the result summaries. InaSAFE will also create a number of spatial and non-spatial products which you can use to generate your own reports - for example by importing the data into a spreadsheet and further analysing it there.

Hazard A hazard represents a natural process or phenomenon that may cause loss of life, injury or other health impacts, property damage, loss of livelihoods and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage. For example; flood, earthquake, tsunami and volcano are all examples of hazards.

UNISDR (2009) Terminology on disaster risk reduction.

Generic Hazard A generic hazard is any dataset where the areas within the data set have been classified as either low, medium, or high hazard level. Use generic hazard in cases where InaSAFE does not have an existing hazard concept for the data you are using.
Exposure Exposure represents people, property, systems, or other elements present in hazard zones that are subject to potential losses in the event of a flood, earthquake, volcano etc.

UNISDR (2009) Terminology on disaster risk reduction.

Affected An exposure element (e.g. people, roads, buildings, land cover) that experiences a hazard (e.g. tsunami, flood, earthquake) and endures consequences (e.g. damage, evacuation, displacement, death) due to that hazard.

UNISDR (2015)Proposed Updated Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction: A Technical Review

Exposed People People who are present in hazard zones and are thereby subject to potential losses. In InaSAFE, people who are exposed are those people who are within the extent of the hazard.

UNISDR (2009)Terminology on Disaster

Affected People People who are affected by a hazardous event. People can be affected directly or indirectly. Affected people may experience short-term or long-term consequences to their lives, livelihoods or health and in the economic, physical, social, cultural and environmental assets. In InaSAFE, people who are killed during the event are also considered affected.

UNISDR (2015)Proposed Updated Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction: A Technical Review

Directly Affected People People who have suffered injury, illness or other health effects who were evacuated, displaced,relocated; or have suffered direct damage to their livelihoods, economic, physical, social,cultural and environmental assets. In InaSAFE, people who are missing or dead may be considered as directly affected.

UNISDR (2015)Proposed Updated Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction: A Technical Review

Indirectly Affected People People who have suffered consequences, other than or in addition to direct effects, over time due to disruption or changes in economy, critical infrastructures, basic services, commerce,work or social, health and psychological consequences. In InaSAFE, people who are indirectly affected are not included in minimum needs reports.

UNISDR (2015)Proposed Updated Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction: A Technical Review

Displaced People Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.

UNISDR (2015)Proposed Updated Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction: A Technical Review

Displacement Rate The population displacement ratio for a given hazard class.
Evacuated People Evacuated people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk conditions or disaster, move temporarily to safer places before, during or after the occurrence of a hazardous event. Evacuation can occur from places of residence, workplaces, schools and hospitals to other places. Evacuation is usually a planned and organised mobilisation of persons, animals and goods for eventual return. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.

UNISDR (2015)Proposed Updated Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction: A Technical Review

Relocated People Relocated people are people who, for different reasons or circumstances because of risk or disaster, have moved permanently from their places of residence to new sites.

UNISDR (2015)Proposed Updated Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction: A Technical Review

Injured People People suffering from a new or exacerbated physical or psychological harm, trauma or an illness as a result of a hazardous event.

UNISDR (2015)Proposed Updated Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction: A Technical Review

Killed People People who lost their lives as a consequence of a hazardous event.

UNISDR (2015)Proposed Updated Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction: A Technical Review

Gender

Term Description
Female Relating to the characteristics of women.

Oxford Dictionary.

Male Relating to the characteristics of men.

Oxford Dictionary.

Demographics

Term Description
People Human beings in general or considered collectively.

Oxford Dictionary.

Infant A very young child or baby aged between 0 and 4 years.

Oxford Dictionary.

World Population Dashboard. ICPD Goals and Demographic Indicators 2016.

Child A young person aged between 5 and 14 years, usually below the age of puberty.

Oxford Dictionary.

World Population Dashboard. ICPD Goals and Demographic Indicators 2016.

Youth A person aged between 0 and 14 years.

World Population Dashboard. ICPD Goals and Demographic Indicators 2016.

Adult Person aged between 15 and 64 years, usually of working age.

World Population Dashboard. ICPD Goals and Demographic Indicators 2016.

Elderly Persons aged 65 years and over.

World Population Dashboard. ICPD Goals and Demographic Indicators 2016.

Vulnerability

Term Description
Disabled A person having a physical or mental condition that limits their movements, senses, or activities.

Oxford Dictionary.

World Report on Disability.

Under 5 Persons aged under 5 years

World Population Dashboard. ICPD Goals and Demographic Indicators 2016.

Over 60 Persons aged 60 years and over

World Population Aging 2013

Child Bearing Age The span of ages (usually 15-49) at which individuals are capable of becoming parents. The phrase can be applied to men and women but most frequently refers to women.

UNFPA One Voice

Pregnant A female having a child developing in the uterus.

Oxford Dictionary.

Lactating A female producing milk to feed a baby.

Oxford Dictionary.

Minimum needs

Term Description
Rice Grains of rice used as food.

Oxford Dictionary.

Drinking Water Water pure enough for drinking.

Oxford Dictionary.

Clean Water Water suitable for washing and other purposes but not suitable for drinking.
Family Kit Relief supplies such as clothing to support families.

BNPB Perka 7/2008

Hygiene Pack Relief supplies to promote practices conducive to maintaining health and preventing disease.

Oxford Dictionary.

Toilet A room, building or cubicle with facilities to collect and dispose of human waste.

Oxford Dictionary.

Data representation

Term Description
Thresholds A range defined with a minimum and maximum value. In InaSAFE we exclude the minimum value but include the maximum value. In mathematical expression: minimum value < x <= maximum value. It is used for doing classification of continuous data.
Value Maps A conceptual mapping between one set of unique values and another set of unique values. Each unique value represents a particular class. It is used to express terms or concepts from one classification system in another classification system and only applies to non-continuous data. For example a value map can be used to express local names for entities (e.g.street type: "alley") into generic concepts (e.g.street type: "residential").
Rounding Methodology Note that report rows containing totals are calculated from the entire analysis area totals and then rounded, whereas the subtotal rows are calculated from the aggregation areas and then rounded. Using this approach we avoid adding already rounded numbers and in so doing compounding the rounding.

Productivity

Term Description
Productivity Rate The weight of a crop from land cover can produce per area unit. The unit is in hundred kilograms /hectare.
Productivity The number of crop in hundred kilograms unit that can be produced in a land cover area.
Production Cost Rate The amount of money that is needed to build a crop land cover per area unit. The default unit is currency per area unit (e.g. IDR/hectare, USD/hectare).
Production Cost The amount of money that is needed to build a crop land cover area. The unit is a currency unit (e.g. IDR, USD, Euro).
Production Value Rate The price of a crop per area unit. The default unit is currency per area unit. (e.g. IDR/hectare, USD/hectare).
Production Value The price of a crop in a land cover area. The unit is a currency unit (e.g. IDR, USD, Euro).

Core functionality and tools

The InaSAFE Dock

InaSAFE is free software that produces realistic natural hazard impact scenarios for better planning, preparedness and response activities. It provides a simple but rigourous way to combine data from scientists, local governments and communities to provide insights into the likely impacts of future disaster events.

The InaSAFE 'dock panel' helps you to run hazard impact analysis within the QGIS environment. It helps you create your hazard impact analysis question and shows the results of this analysis. If you are a new user, you may also consider using the 'Impact Function Centric Wizard' to run the analysis. This wizard will guide you through the process of running an InaSAFE assessment, with interactive step by step instructions. You can launch the wizard by clicking on this icon in the toolbar:

You can drag and drop the dock panel to reposition it on the screen. For example, dragging the panel towards the right margin of the QGIS application will dock it to the right side of the screen.

There are three main areas to the dock panel:

You can get help at any time in InaSAFE by clicking on the help buttons provided on each dock and dialog.

The questions area

The intention of InaSAFE is to make it easy to perform your impact analysis. We start the analysis in the questions area. This area contains three drop down menus. You create your question by using these drop down menus to select the hazard and exposure data you wish to perform the analysis on. All questions follow this form: In the event of a [hazard], how many [exposure] might be [impacted]?

For example: "If there is a flood, how many buildings might be flooded?"

InaSAFE can be used to answer such questions for hazards such as flood, tsunami, volcanic ash fall and earthquake and exposures such as population, roads, structures, land cover etc.

The first step in answering these questions is to load layers that represent either hazard scenarios or exposure data into QGIS. A hazard, for example, may be represented as a raster layer in QGIS where each pixel in the raster represents the flood depth following an inundation event. An exposure layer could be represented, for example, as vector polygon data representing building outlines, or a raster outline where each pixel represents the number of people thought to be living in that cell.

InaSAFE will combine these two layers in a mathematical model. The results of this model will show what the effect of the hazard will be on the exposed infrastructure or people. The plugin relies on simple keyword metadata associated with each layer to determine what kind of information the layer represents. You can define these keywords by selecting a layer and then clicking the InaSAFE Keywords Wizard icon on the toolbar: The wizard will guide you through the process of defining the keywords for that layer.

Aggregation is the process whereby we group the analysis results by district so that you can see how many people, roads or buildings were affected in each area. This will help you to understand where the most critical needs are. Aggregation is optional in InaSAFE - if you do not use aggregation, the entire analysis area will be used for the data summaries. Typically aggregation layers in InaSAFE have the name of the district or reporting area as attributes. It is also possible to use extended attributes to indicate the ratio of men and women; youth, adults and elderly living in each area. Where these are provided and the exposure layer is population, InaSAFE will provide a demographic breakdown per aggregation area indicating how many men, women, etc. were probably affected in that area.

The results area

After running an analysis, the question area is hidden to maximise the amount of space allocated to the results area. You can re-open the question area at any time by pressing the 'show question form' button.

The results area is used to display various useful feedback items to the user. Once an impact scenario has been run, a summary table will be shown.

If you select an impact layer (i.e. a layer that was produced using an InaSAFE Impact Function), in the QGIS layers list, this summary will also be displayed in the results area. When you select a hazard or exposure layer in the QGIS layers list, the keywords for that layer will be shown in the results area, making it easy to understand what metadata exists for that layer.

The results area is also used to display status information. For example, during the analysis process, the status area will display notes about each step in the analysis process. The 'Run' button will be activated when both a valid hazard and valid exposure layer have been added in QGIS.

Finally, the results area is also used to display any error messages so that you can see what went wrong and why. You may need to scroll down to view the message completely to see all of the error message details.

After running the impact scenario calculation, the question is automatically hidden to make the results area as large as possible. If you want to see what the question used in the analysis was, click on the 'Show question form' button at the top of the results area.

If you want to hide the question area again to have more space to display the results, click on the layer you just calculated with InaSAFE in the Layers list of QGIS to make it active.

The buttons area

The buttons area contains four buttons:

Data conversions

When running a scenario, the data being used needs to be processed into a state where it is acceptable for use by InaSAFE. In particular it should be noted that:

Generating impact reports

When the impact analysis has completed you may want to generate a report. Usually the 'Print...' button will be enabled immediately after analysis. Selecting an InaSAFE impact layer in QGIS Layers panel will also enable it.

To start report generation you need to click on the Print button in the buttons area. This will open the Impact report dialog which has three main areas.

There are four options on which template would you use to generate a map report.

InaSAFE Reports

To start report generation you need to click on the Print button in the buttons area. This will open the Impact report dialog which has three main areas.

There are four options on which template would you use to generate a map report.

Managing analysis extents with the extents selector

This tool allows you to specify which geographical region should be used for your analysis. If you want to check what area will be included in your analysis, enable the 'Toggle scenario outlines' tool on the InaSAFE toolbar:

Your user defined extent will be shown on the map as a rectangle. There are a number of different modes that can be used which are described below:

Use intersection of hazard and exposure layers

The largest area that can be analysed is the intersection of the hazard and exposure layers you have added. To choose this option, click 'Use intersection of hazard and exposure layers'.

Sometimes it is more useful to analyse a smaller area. This could be to reduce processing time (smaller areas with process faster) or because information is only needed in a certain area (e.g. if a district only wants information for their district, not for the entire city). If you want to analyse a smaller area, there are a few different ways to do this.

Use intersection of hazard, exposure and current view extent

If you wish to conduct the analysis on the area currently shown in the window, you can set the analysis area to 'Use intersection of hazard, exposure and current view extent'. If the extents of the datasets are smaller than the view extent, the analysis area will be reduced to the extents of the datasets.

Use intersection of hazard, exposure and this bookmark

You can also use one of your QGIS bookmarks to set the analysis area. This option will be greyed out if you have no bookmarks.

To create a bookmark, zoom to the area you want to create a bookmark for. When you are happy with the extent, click the 'New bookmark' button in the QGIS toolbar.

The drop down menu in the InaSAFE Analysis Area window should now be activated. When you choose a bookmark from the drop down menu it will zoom to the analysis area selected by the bookmark.

Use intersection of hazard, exposure and this bounding box

You can also choose the analysis area interactively by clicking 'Use intersection of hazard, exposure and this bounding box'. This will allow you to click 'Drag on map' which will temporarily hide this window and allow you to drag a rectangle on the map. After you have finished dragging the rectangle, this window will reappear with values in the North, South, East and West boxes. If the extents of the datasets are smaller than the user defined analysis area, the analysis area will be reduced to the extents of the datasets.

Alternatively, you can enter the coordinates directly into the N/S/E/W boxes once the 'Use intersection of hazard, exposure and this bounding box' option is selected (using the same coordinate reference system, or CRS, as the map is currently set).

InaSAFE Options

The InaSAFE options dialog is used to control various aspects of the InaSAFE analysis and reporting environment. Here are brief descriptions of all the options available, grouped by the tab page on which they occur.

Organisation Profile tab

The Organisation Profile tab provides several general settings:

Population Parameters tab

In this tab you can define some parameters that will be used by InaSAFE in the analysis of exposed populations. You have the option to change the parameters for whether the exposed population is considered to be affected by each hazard type and class, and the displacement rate that will be used for affected people.

Please refer to the InaSAFE manual for concept definitions and more information on the source of the hazard classifications and default settings. We really encourage you to consider these parameters carefully and to choose appropriate values for your local situation based on past events and expert knowledge.

GIS Environment tab

The GIS Environment tab provides several general settings:

Earthquake tab

In this tab you can select which earthquake fatality model to use when estimating earthquake impact on population. This option is global - it will affect all subsequent earthquake analyses carried out in InaSAFE.

When selecting an earthquake analysis model, its details will be shown below in the text box area.

Template Options tab

This tab has options relating to the generation of map composer templates and how reports will be printed:.

Demographic Defaults tab

In this tab you will find options for setting the default ratios for demographic groups. There is more detailed help on demographic groups within the main help page for InaSAFE in the Field Mapping Tool section. Essentially default ratios for demographic groups determine what proportion of the population are within each population group (e.g. infants versus children etc.). The options defined in this tab are used in cases where you choose to use the global default ratios while configuring the keywords for an aggregation layer as shown below.

Note that the contents of this tab may changed depending on what groups have been defined for demographic breakdowns.

Advanced tab

This tab contains options intended for advanced users only:

The Batch Runner

With this tool you can set up numerous scenarios and run them all in one go. A typical use case may be where you define a number of e.g. flood impact scenarios all using a standard data set e.g. flood.shp. As new flood data becomes available you replace flood.shp and rerun the scenarios using the batch runner. Using this approach you can quickly produce regional contingency plans as your understanding of hazards changes. When you run the batch of scenarios, pdf reports are generated automatically and all placed in a single common directory making it easy for you to browse and disseminate the reports produced.

When the batch process completes, it will also produce a summary report like this:

InaSAFE Batch Report File
P: gempa bumi Sumatran fault (Mw7.8)
P: gempa di Yogya tahun 2006
P: banjir jakarta 2007
P: Tsunami di Maumere (Mw 8.1)
P: gempa Mw6.5 Palu-Koro Fault
P: gunung merapi meletus
-----------------------------
Total passed: 6
Total failed: 0
Total tasks: 6

Before running the Batch Runner you might want to use the 'save scenario' tool to first save some scenarios on which you can let the batch runner do its work. This tool lets you run saved scenarios in one go. It lets you select scenarios or let run all scenarios in one go.

The OpenStreetmap Downloader

This tool will fetch building ('structure') or road ('highway') data from the OpenStreetMap project for you. The downloaded data will have InaSAFE keywords defined and a default QGIS style applied. To use this tool effectively:

When the Political boundaries box in the Feature types menu is ticked, the Political boundary options panel will be enabled. The panel lets you select which admin level you wish to download. The admin levels are country specific. When you select an admin level, the local name for that admin level will be shown. You can change which country is used for the admin level description using the country drop down menu. The country will be automatically set to coincide with the view extent if a matching country can be found.

Note: We have only provide presets for a subset of the available countries. If you want to know what the levels are for your country, please check on the following web page: List of OSM Admin Boundary definitions

The PetaBencana Downloader

This tool will fetch current flood data for Jakarta from PetaBencana.id

The Shakemap Converter

This tool will convert an earthquake 'shakemap' that is in grid xml format into a GeoTIFF file. The imported file can be used in InaSAFE as an input for impact functions that require an earthquake layer. To use this tool effectively:

The Multi Buffer Tool

This tool will generate a polygon layer by multi-buffering the input layer. To use this tool effectively:

The Field Mapping Tool

This tool allows you to define field mappings to use for demographic breakdowns of your analysis results. You can activate the tool on the InaSAFE toolbar:

Field mapping describes the process of matching one or more fields in an attribute table to a concept in InaSAFE. The field mappings tool InaSAFE allows you to match concepts such as "elderly", "disabled people", "pregnant" and so on to their counterpart fields in either an aggregation layer or an exposure population vector layer.

Note: It is not possible to use this tool with raster population exposure data, but ratios defined in aggregation layers will be used when raster exposure population data is used.

The illustration above shows the principle behind InaSAFE's demographic breakdown reporting system. The idea here is to support the production of a detailed demographic breakdown when carrying out an analysis with a population exposure vector dataset. So for example instead of simply reporting on the total number of people exposed to a hazard, we want to break down the affected population into distinct demographic groups. In InaSAFE by default we consider three groups:

In the diagram above, you can see that we have an "age" group (column on the right) which, for purposes of illustration, has two age classes: "infant" and "child" (center column). These age classes are defined in InaSAFE metadata and there are actually five classes in a default installation. In the left hand column you can see a number of columns listed from the attribute table. In this example our population data contains columns for different age ranges (0-1, 1-2, 2-4, 4-6). The field mapping tool can be used in order to combine the data in the "0 - 1" and "1 - 2" columns into a new column called "infant". In the next section of this document we enumerate the different groups and concepts that InaSAFE supports when generating demographic breakdowns.

When the tool is used, it will write additional data to the exposure or aggregation layer keywords so that your preferred concept mappings will be used when reports are generated after the analysis is carried out. You should note the following special characteristics of the field mapping tool when used for aggregation datasets versus when used for vector population exposure datasets:

Aggregation datasets: For aggregation datasets, the field mapping tool uses global defaults (see the InaSAFE Options Dialog documentation for more details) or dataset level defaults to determine which ratios should be used to calculate concept values. For example, in the age group the aggregation dataset may specify that infants should by calculated as a ratio of 0.1% of the total population. Note that for aggregation datasets you can only use ratios, not counts.

Vector population exposure datasets: For exposure datasets, ratios are not supported, only counts. The field mappings carried out here will be used to generate new columns during a pre-processing step before the actual analysis is carried out.

The interplay between default ratios, aggregation layer provided ratios and population exposure layers is illustrated in the table below.

Aggregation Raster Vector, no counts Vector with counts Notes
No aggregation Use global default ratio Use global default ratio Use count to determine ratio
Aggregation, ratio not set Use global default ratio Do nothing Use count to determine ratio
Aggregation, ratio value set Use aggregation layer ratio Use aggregation layer ratio Use count to determine ratio
Aggregation, ratio field mapping set Use aggregation layer ratio Use aggregation layer ratio Use count to determine ratio

Exposure Groups

The following demographic groups apply only to vector population exposure layers:

Age Count

Demographic breakdown to use for displaced population based on age groups. Age count groupings are used when there is a vector population dataset that contains detailed demographic information (as counts) about the population living in each administrative or census area.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Infant Count infant Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of infant people for each feature. "Infant" is defined as: A very young child or baby aged between 0 and 4 years. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of infants per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The infant count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Child Count child Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of child people for each feature. "Child" is defined as: A young person aged between 5 and 14 years, usually below the age of puberty. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of child per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The child count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Youth Count youth Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of young people for each feature. "Youth" is defined as: A person aged between 0 and 14 years. This definition may not align well with the definition of youth in the humanitarian sector. It should be noted that this concept overlaps with the concepts of infant and child in InaSAFE. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of youths per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The youth count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Adult Count adult Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of adults for each feature. "Adult" is defined as: Person aged between 15 and 64 years, usually of working age. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of adults per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The adult count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Elderly Count elderly Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of elderly people for each feature. "Elderly" is defined as: Persons aged 65 years and over. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of adults per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The elderly count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Gender Count

Demographic breakdown produced for displaced population based on gender groups (female, pregnant, etc.). These demographic concepts provide a detailed break down of the number of people displaced in each age group.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Male Count male Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of males for each feature. "Male" is defined as: Relating to the characteristics of men. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of males per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The male count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Female Count female Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of females for each feature. "Female" is defined as: Relating to the characteristics of women. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of females per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The female count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Age Vulnerability Count

Demographic breakdown to use for displaced population based on age. Vulnerability count groupings are used when there is a vector exposure layer that contains detailed demographic information (as counts) about the population living in each area. These counts are then used to calculate the ratio of vulnerable population sectors for each aggregation area. These are then used to produce a detailed break down of the number of displaced people in each age profile. Vulnerable segments of the population can include criteria like the number of infants, the number of elderly, the number of disabled people, and so on.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Under 5 Count under_5 Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of under 5 years old for each feature. "Under 5" is defined as: Persons aged under 5 years In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of people under 5 years old per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The under 5 years count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Over 60 Count over_60 Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of over 60 years old for each feature. "Over 60" is defined as: Persons aged 60 years and over In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of people over 60 years old per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The over 60 years count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Gender Vulnerability Count

Demographic breakdown to use for displaced population based on gender. Vulnerability count groupings are used when there is a vector exposure layer that contains detailed demographic information (as counts) about the population living in each area. These counts are then used to calculate the ratio of vulnerable population sectors for each aggregation area. These are then used to produce a detailed break down of the number of displaced people in each gender profile. Vulnerable segments of the population can include criteria like the number of infants, the number of pregnant women, lactating women and so on.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Child Bearing Age Count child_bearing_age Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of child bearing age for each feature. "Child Bearing Age" is defined as: The span of ages (usually 15-49) at which individuals are capable of becoming parents. The phrase can be applied to men and women but most frequently refers to women. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of child bearing age per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The child bearing age count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Pregnant Women Count pregnant Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of pregnant women for each feature. "Pregnant" is defined as: A female having a child developing in the uterus. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of pregnant women per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The pregnant women count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Lactating Count lactating Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of lactating women for each feature. "Lactating" is defined as: A female producing milk to feed a baby. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of lactating women per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The lactating count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Disabled Vulnerability Count

Demographic breakdown to use for displaced population based on displacement vulnerability. Disabled count groupings are used when there is a vector exposure layer that contains detailed demographic information (as counts) about the population living in each area. These counts are then used to calculate the ratio of disabled people to the total population for each aggregation area. These are then used to produce a detailed break down of the number of displaced people in each area.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Disabled Count disabled Whole number, Decimal number 0
The proportion of disabled people for each feature. "Disabled" is defined as: A person having a physical or mental condition that limits their movements, senses, or activities. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of disabled people per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The disabled count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.

Aggregation Groups

The following demographic groups apply only to aggregation layers:

Age Ratio

Demographic breakdown to use for displaced population based on age groups. Age ratio groupings are used when there is a vector aggregation layer that contains detailed demographic information (as ratios) about the population living in each administrative or census area. These ratios are then applied to the count of displaced population per aggregation area to provide a more detailed break down of the number of people displaced in each age group.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Infant Ratio infant_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of infant people for each feature. "Infant" is defined as: A very young child or baby aged between 0 and 4 years. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of infants per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The infant count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Child Ratio child_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of child people for each feature. "Child" is defined as: A young person aged between 5 and 14 years, usually below the age of puberty. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of child per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The child count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Youth Ratio youth_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of young people for each feature. "Youth" is defined as: A person aged between 0 and 14 years. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of youths per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The youth count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Adult Ratio adult_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of adults for each feature. "Adult" is defined as: Person aged between 15 and 64 years, usually of working age. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of adults per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The adult count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Elderly Ratio elderly_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of elderly people for each feature. "Elderly" is defined as: Persons aged 65 years and over. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of adults per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The elderly count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Gender Ratio

Demographic breakdown to use for displaced population based on gender. Gender ratio groupings are used when there is a vector aggregation layer that contains detailed demographic information ( as ratios) about the population living in each administrative or census area. These ratios are then applied to the count of displaced population per aggregation area to provide a more detailed break down of the number of people displaced in each gender profile. Gender specific info can include criteria like the number of females, the number of females of child bearing age, and so on.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Male Ratio male_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of male for each feature. "Male" is defined as: Relating to the characteristics of men. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of males per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The male count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Female Ratio female_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of females for each feature. "Female" is defined as: Relating to the characteristics of women. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of females per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The female count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Age Vulnerability Ratio

Demographic breakdown to use for displaced population based on age. Vulnerability ratio groupings are used when there is a vector aggregation layer that contains detailed demographic information (as ratios) about the population living in each administrative or census area. These ratios are then applied to the count of displaced population per aggregation area to provide a more detailed break down of the number of people displaced in each age profile. Vulnerable segments of the population can include criteria like the number of infants, the number of elderly, the number of disabled people, and so on.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Under 5 Years Ratio under_5_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of under 5 years old for each feature. "Under 5" is defined as: Persons aged under 5 years In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of people under 5 years old per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The under 5 years count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Over 60 Years Ratio over_60_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of over 60 years old for each feature. "Over 60" is defined as: Persons aged 60 years and over In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of people over 60 years old per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The over 60 years count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Gender Vulnerability Ratio

Demographic breakdown to use for displaced population based on gender. Vulnerability ratio groupings are used when there is a vector aggregation layer that contains detailed demographic information (as ratios) about the population living in each administrative or census area. These ratios are then applied to the count of displaced population per aggregation area to provide a more detailed break down of the number of people displaced in each gender profile. Vulnerable segments of the population can include criteria like the number of infants, the number of elderly, the number of disabled people, and so on.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Child Bearing Age Ratio child_bearing_age_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of child bearing age for each feature. "Child Bearing Age" is defined as: The span of ages (usually 15-49) at which individuals are capable of becoming parents. The phrase can be applied to men and women but most frequently refers to women. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of child bearing age per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The child bearing age count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Pregnant Ratio pregnant_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of pregnant women for each feature. "Pregnant or Lactating" is defined as: A female having a child developing in the uterus. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of pregnant women per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The pregnant count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Lactating Ratio lactating_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of lactating women for each feature. "Lactating" is defined as: A female producing milk to feed a baby. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of lactating people per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The lactating count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Disability Vulnerability Ratio

Demographic breakdown to use for displaced population based on disability vulnerability. Disability vulnerability ratio groupings are used when there is a vector aggregation layer that contains detailed demographic information (as ratios) about the disabled population living in each administrative or census area. These ratios are then applied to the count of displaced population per aggregation area to provide a more detailed break down of the number of disabled people displaced in each area.

Notes:
General notes:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Disabled Ratio disabled_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of disabled people for each feature. "Disabled" is defined as: A person having a physical or mental condition that limits their movements, senses, or activities. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of disabled people per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The disabled count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.

Minimum Needs

The minimum needs tool

This tool will calculated minimum needs for evacuated people. To use this tool effectively:

The minimum needs manager

During and after a disaster, providing for the basic human minimum needs of food, water, hygiene and shelter is an important element of your contingency plan. InaSAFE has a customisable minimum needs system that allows you to define country or region specific requirements for compiling a needs report where the exposure layer represents population.

By default InaSAFE uses minimum needs defined for Indonesia - and ships with additional profiles for the Philippines and Tanzania. You can customise these or add your own region-specific profiles too.

Minimum needs are grouped into regional or linguistic 'profiles'. The default profile is 'BNPB_en' - the english profile for the national disaster agency in Indonesia. You will see that this profile defines requirements for displaced persons in terms of Rice, Drinking Water, Clean Water (for bathing etc.), Family Kits (with personal hygiene items) and provision of toilets.

Each item in the profile can be customised or removed. For example selecting the first item in the list and then clicking on the 'pencil' icon will show the details of how it was defined. If you scroll up and down in the panel you will see that for each item, you can set a name, description, units (in singular, plural and abbreviated forms), specify maxima and minima for the quantity of item allowed, a default and a frequency. You would use the maxima and minima to ensure that disaster managers never allocate amounts that will not be sufficient for human livelihood, and also that will not overtax the logistics operation for those providing humanitarian relief.

The final item in the item configuration is the 'readable sentence' which bears special discussion. Using a simple system of tokens you can construct a sentence that will be used in the generated needs report.

Minimum needs profiles

A profile is a collection of resources that define the minimum needs for a particular country or region. Typically a profile should be based on a regional, national or international standard. The actual definition of which resources are needed in a given profile is dependent on the local conditions and customs for the area where the contingency plan is being devised.

For example in the middle east, rice is a staple food whereas in South Africa, maize meal is a staple food and thus the contingency planning should take these localised needs into account.

Minimum needs resources

Each item in a minimum needs profile is a resource. Each resource is described as a simple natural language sentence e.g.:

Each person should be provided with 2.8 kilograms of Rice weekly.

By clicking on a resource entry in the profile window, and then clicking the black pencil icon you will be able to edit the resource using the resource editor. Alternatively you can create a new resource for a profile by clicking on the black + icon in the profile manager. You can also remove any resource from a profile using the - icon in the profile manager.

Resource Editor

When switching to edit or add resource mode, the minimum needs manager will be updated to show the resource editor. Each resource is described in terms of:

These parameters are probably all fairly self explanatory, but the readable sentence probably needs further detail. The sentence is compiled using a simple keyword token replacement system. The following tokens can be used:

When the token is placed in the sentence it will be replaced with the actual value at report generation time. This contrived example shows a tokenised sentence that includes all possible keywords:

A displaced person should be provided with {{ Default }} {{ Unit }}/{{ Units }}/{{ Unit abbreviation }} of {{ Resource name }}. Though no less than {{ Minimum allowed }} and no more than {{ Maximum allowed }}. This should be provided {{ Frequency }}.

Would generate a human readable sentence like this:

A displaced person should be provided with 2.8 kilogram/kilograms/kg of rice. Though no less than 0 and no more than 100. This should be provided daily.

Once you have populated the resource elements, click the Save resource button to return to the profile view. You will see the new resource added in the profile's resource list.

Managing profiles

In addition to the profiles that come as standard with InaSAFE, you can create new ones, either from scratch, or based on an existing one (which you can then modify).

Use the New button to create new profile. When prompted, give your profile a name e.g. 'JakartaProfile'.

Note: The profile must be saved in your home directory under .qgis2/minimum_needs in order for InaSAFE to successfully detect it.

An alternative way to create a new profile is to use the Save as to clone an existing profile. The clone profile can then be edited according to your specific needs.

Active profile

It is important to note, that which ever profile you select in the Profile pick list, will be considered active and will be used as the basis for all minimum needs analysis. You need to restart QGIS before the changed profile become active.

Analysis steps

Analysis internal process

An analysis from the point of view of using InaSAFE is the process whereby a hazard layer, an exposure layer and an optional aggregation layer are used to determine the potential impact of the hazard data on the exposure. The analysis results are grouped by region (as defined in the aggregation layer).

In InaSAFE the analysis process commences with a preparation phase where each input layer is pre-processed to ensure that it is in a consistent state. The hazard and aggregation are reprojected to the same coordinate reference system of the exposure dataset. Any data that is not within the selected aggregation areas is removed. Note that any modifications made are done on copies of the original data - the original data are not modified in any way.

Any continuous datasets are reclassified into classfied (also sometimes referred to as categorical) datasets.

The aggregation layer and the hazard are combined using a GIS union operation and then each exposure within these areas is counted to arrive at a total number, length or area of exposure features per aggregation area. These processes are defined in more detail below. After the primary GIS processing has been carried out, one or more post-processors are applied to the resulting datasets in order to compute statistics like the breakdown of buildings or the area of each land use type in the affected areas.

The final part of the analysis process is report generation whereby InaSAFE generates various tables and cartographic products to represent the result summaries. InaSAFE will also create a number of spatial and non-spatial products which you can use to generate your own reports - for example by importing the data into a spreadsheet and further analysing it there.

Progress reporting steps

Analysis initialisation

In this phase we clear the impact function state and work logs.

Data store creation

In this phase we create a data store. The data store is a folder or GeoPackage containing all of the working data used for and produced by this analysis.

Pre processing

During this step we check if we can create some side products based on your inputs.

Hazard preparation

During the hazard preparation phase of the analysis, we convert the hazard data to a classified vector layer if it is not already in this format.

Exposure preparation

During the exposure preparation phase of the analysis, we convert the exposure data to a usable format for the analysis.

Aggregation preparation

During this step we prepare the aggregation data, extracting only the selected polygons from the aggregation layer, and reprojecting to aggregation data to the exposure layer's coordinate reference system.

Aggregate hazard preparation

In this step we union the hazard data and the aggregation data then remove any of the resulting polygons that do not intersect the aggregation areas. Each resulting polygon stores the id and class of the hazard and the id and name from the aggregation area.

Combine aggregate hazard and exposure

In this step we combine the aggregate hazard and exposure layers to produce an intermediate impact layer where each exposure feature has been assigned an aggregation id and name, hazard id and class and a column indicating whether the exposed feature is affected or not.

Post processing

During this step we analyse each exposure feature to determine additional vulnerability attributes such as gender breakdown age breakdown, minimum needs and so on. This additional information is written into the impact layers.

Summary calculation

At the end of the analysis we summarise the analysis results by aggregate hazard areas, aggregation areas and the total analysis area.

Profiling

At the end of the analysis we extract profiling data so that we can provide a detailed work log and also help you to identify any bottlenecks in the processing flow.

Hazard Concepts

Scenario

This describes the type of hazard scenario that is represented by the layer. There are two possible values for this attribute, single event and multiple event.

Single event

Single event hazard data can be based on either a specific event that has happened in the past, for example a flood like Jakarta 2013, or a possible event, such as the tsunami that results from an earthquake near Bima, that might happen in the future.

Multiple event

Multiple event hazard data can be based on historical observations such as a hazard map of all observed volcanic deposits around a volcano.

This type of hazard data shows those locations that might be impacted by a volcanic eruption in the future. Another example might be a probabilistic hazard model that shows the likelihood of a magnitude 7 earthquake happening in the next 50 years.

Hazards

A hazard represents a natural process or phenomenon that may cause loss of life, injury or other health impacts, property damage, loss of livelihoods and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage. For example; flood, earthquake, tsunami and volcano are all examples of hazards.

Citations:

Flood

A flood describes the inundation of land that is normally dry by a large amount of water. For example: A flood can occur after heavy rainfall, when a river overflows its banks or when a dam breaks. The effect of a flood is for land that is normally dry to become wet.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:
Notes for single events

No single event notes defined.

Notes for multi events / scenarios:

No multi-event notes defined.

Actions:

Units:

Name Plural Abbreviation Details
Feet feet ft Feet are an imperial unit of measure. There are 12 inches in 1 foot and 3 feet in 1 yard.
Metres metres m Metres are a metric unit of measure. There are 100 centimetres in 1 metre.
Generic generic generic A generic unit for value that does not have unit or we do not know about the unit. It also can be used for normalised values.

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Flood wet/dry classes

This is a binary classification for an area. The area is either wet (affected by flood water) or dry (not affected by flood water). This unit does not describe how wet or dry an area is.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
Wet True unspecified 1% wet,1,YES,y,true 1 9999
Water is present above ground height.
Dry False unspecified 0% dry,0,No,n,false 0 1
No water encountered above ground height.
Not exposed

Flood classes

This is a flood classification for an area. The area is broken down into a number of flood classes of increasing severity based on the water depth.

Citations:

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 5% high,severe 1.5 9999
Flooding is over 150 centimetres.
Medium True unspecified 3% medium,moderate 0.7 1.5
Flooding between 71 and 150 centimetres.
Low True unspecified 1% low,minor 0.1 0.7
Flooding of between 10 and 70 centimetres.
Use caution False unspecified 0% caution,unknown 0 0.1
An unknown level of flooding - use caution -
Not exposed

Generic classes

A generic hazard is any dataset where the areas within the data set have been classified as either low, medium, or high hazard level. Use generic hazard in cases where InaSAFE does not have an existing hazard concept for the data you are using.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% high 3 4
The area with the highest hazard.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 2 3
The area with the medium hazard.
Low False unspecified 0% low 0 2
The area with the lowest hazard.
Not exposed

Tsunami

A tsunami describes a large ocean wave or series or waves usually caused by an underwater earthquake or volcano. A tsunami at sea may go unnoticed but a tsunami wave that strikes land may cause massive destruction and flooding.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:
Notes for single events
Notes for multi events / scenarios:

No multi-event notes defined.

Actions:

Units:

Name Plural Abbreviation Details
Feet feet ft Feet are an imperial unit of measure. There are 12 inches in 1 foot and 3 feet in 1 yard.
Metres metres m Metres are a metric unit of measure. There are 100 centimetres in 1 metre.

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Tsunami classes

Tsunami hazards can be classified into one of four classes for an area. The area is either dry, low, medium, or high, for tsunami hazard classification. The following description for these classes is provided by Badan Geologi based on BNPB Perka 2/2012

Citations:

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% high 3 9999
The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth > 3 m or reach a tsunami intensity scale of VII or more (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave with 4 m inundation depth cause damage to small vessel, a few ships are drifted inland, severe damage on most wooden houses. Boulders are deposited on shore. If tsunami height reaches 8 m, it will cause severe damage. Dykes, wave breaker, tsunami protection walls and green belts will be washed away.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 1 3
Water above 1.1m and less than 3.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth of 1 - 3 m or equal to V-VI tsunami intensity scale (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave with a 3m inundation depth causes most people frightened and to flee to higher ground. Small vessels drift and collide. Damage occurs to some wooden houses, while most of them are safe.
Low False unspecified 0% low 0.1 1
Water above ground height and less than 1.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth less than 1 m or similar to tsunami intensity scale of V or less in (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave of 1m height causes few people to be frightened and flee to higher elevation. Felt by most people on large ship, observed from shore. Small vessels drift and collide and some turn over. Sand is deposited and there is flooding of areas close to the shore.
Dry False unspecified 0% dry 0 0.1
No water above ground height.
Not exposed

Tsunami population classes

Tsunami hazards can be classified into one of three classes for an area. The area is either low, medium, or high, for tsunami hazard classification. The following description for these classes is provided by Badan Geologi based on BNPB Perka 2/2012, and modified for population by Pak Hamza

Citations:

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% high 3 9999
The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth > 3 m or reach a tsunami intensity scale of VII or more (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave with 4 m inundation depth cause damage to small vessel, a few ships are drifted inland, severe damage on most wooden houses. Boulders are deposited on shore. If tsunami height reaches 8 m, it will cause severe damage. Dykes, wave breaker, tsunami protection walls and green belts will be washed away.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 0.7 3
Water above 0.7m and less than 3.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth of 1 - 3 m or equal to V-VI tsunami intensity scale (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave with a 3m inundation depth causes most people frightened and to flee to higher ground. Small vessels drift and collide. Damage occurs to some wooden houses, while most of them are safe.
Low True unspecified 0% low 0.1 0.7
Water above ground height and less than 1.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth less than 1 m or similar to tsunami intensity scale of V or less in (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave of 1m height causes few people to be frightened and flee to higher elevation. Felt by most people on large ship, observed from shore. Small vessels drift and collide and some turn over. Sand is deposited and there is flooding of areas close to the shore.
Not exposed

Tsunami classes ITB

Tsunami hazards can be classified into one of five classes for an area. The area is either dry, low, medium, high, or very high for tsunami hazard classification. The following description for these classes is provided by Pak Hamza ITB based on Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001.

Citations:

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
Very high True unspecified 100% very high 8 9999
Water above 8.0m.
High True unspecified 100% high 3 8
Water above 3.1m and less than 8.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth > 3 m or reach a tsunami intensity scale of VII or even more (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave with 4 m inundation depth cause damage to small vessel, a few ships are drifted inland, severe damage on most wooden houses. Boulders are deposited on shore. If tsunami height reaches 8 m, it will cause severe damage. Dykes, wave breaker, tsunami protection walls and green belts will be washed away.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 1 3
Water above 1.1m and less than 3.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth of 1 - 3 m or equal to V-VI tsunami intensity scale (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave with a 3m inundation depth causes most people frightened and to flee to higher ground. Small vessels drift and collide. Damage occurs to some wooden houses, while most of them are safe.
Low False unspecified 0% low 0.1 1
Water above ground height and less than 1.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth less than 1 m or similar to tsunami intensity scale of V or less in (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave of 1m height causes few people to be frightened and flee to higher elevation. Felt by most people on large ship, observed from shore. Small vessels drift and collide and some turn over. Sand is deposited and there is flooding of areas close to the shore.
Dry zone False unspecified 0% dry 0 0.1
No water above ground height.
Not exposed

Tsunami population classes ITB

Tsunami hazards can be classified into one of five classes for an area. The area is either dry, low, medium, high, or very high for tsunami hazard classification. The following description for these classes is provided by Pak Hamza ITB based on Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001.

Citations:

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
Very high True unspecified 100% very high 8 9999
Water above 8.0m.
High True unspecified 100% high 3 8
Water above 3.1m and less than 8.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth > 3 m or reach a tsunami intensity scale of VII or even more (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave with 4 m inundation depth cause damage to small vessel, a few ships are drifted inland, severe damage on most wooden houses. Boulders are deposited on shore. If tsunami height reaches 8 m, it will cause severe damage. Dykes, wave breaker, tsunami protection walls and green belts will be washed away.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 0.7 3
Water above 1.1m and less than 3.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth of 1 - 3 m or equal to V-VI tsunami intensity scale (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave with a 3m inundation depth causes most people frightened and to flee to higher ground. Small vessels drift and collide. Damage occurs to some wooden houses, while most of them are safe.
Low True unspecified 0% low 0.1 0.7
Water above ground height and less than 1.0m. The area is potentially hit by a tsunami wave with an inundation depth less than 1 m or similar to tsunami intensity scale of V or less in (Papadopoulos and Imamura, 2001). Tsunami wave of 1m height causes few people to be frightened and flee to higher elevation. Felt by most people on large ship, observed from shore. Small vessels drift and collide and some turn over. Sand is deposited and there is flooding of areas close to the shore.
Not exposed

Earthquake

An earthquake describes the sudden violent shaking of the ground that occurs as a result of volcanic activity or movement in the earth's crust.

Notes:
General notes:

The following earthquake fatality models are available in InaSAFE. Note that you need to set one of these as the active model in InaSAFE Options. The currently active model is: ITB fatality model

ITB bayesian fatality model

ITB fatality model based on a Bayesian approach. This model was developed by Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) and implemented by Dr. Hyeuk Ryu, Geoscience Australia.

The ITB bayesian fatality model, from Institut Teknologi Bandung 2012, is based on the ITB fatality model and uses Indonesian fatality data

Citations:

ITB fatality model

ITB fatality model is modified from the USGS Pager model. This model was developed by Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) and implemented by Dr. Hadi Ghasemi, Geoscience Australia.

Algorithm:

In this study, the same functional form as Allen (2009) is adopted to express fatality rate as a function of intensity (see Eq. 10 in the report). The Matlab built-in function (fminsearch) for Nelder-Mead algorithm was used to estimate the model parameters. The objective function (L2G norm) that is minimised during the optimisation is the same as the one used by Jaiswal et al. (2010).

The coefficients used in the indonesian model are x=0.62275231, y=8.03314466, zeta=2.15

Caveats and limitations:

The current model is the result of the above mentioned workshop and reflects the best available information. However, the current model has a number of issues listed below and is expected to evolve further over time.

1 - The model is based on limited number of observed fatality rates during 4 past fatal events.

2 - The model clearly over-predicts the fatality rates at intensities higher than VIII.

3 - The model only estimates the expected fatality rate for a given intensity level; however the associated uncertainty for the proposed model is not addressed.

4 - There are few known mistakes in developing the current model:

- rounding MMI values to the nearest 0.5,

- Implementing Finite-Fault models of candidate events, and

- consistency between selected GMPEs with those in use by

Note: Because of these caveats, decisions should not be made solely on the information presented here and should always be verified by ground truthing and other reliable information sources.

Citations:

Pager fatality model

USGS Pager fatality estimation model. This model was developed by Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) and implemented by Dr. Hyeuk Ryu, Geoscience Australia.

The USGS Population Vulnerability Pager fatality model using Indonesian country coefficients.

Citations:

Notes for exposure : Population
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:
Notes for single events

No single event notes defined.

Notes for multi events / scenarios:

No multi-event notes defined.

Actions:

Units:

Name Plural Abbreviation Details
MMI MMI MMI The Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) scale describes the intensity of ground shaking from a earthquake based on the effects observed by people at the surface.
Generic generic generic A generic unit for value that does not have unit or we do not know about the unit. It also can be used for normalised values.

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Generic classes

A generic hazard is any dataset where the areas within the data set have been classified as either low, medium, or high hazard level. Use generic hazard in cases where InaSAFE does not have an existing hazard concept for the data you are using.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% high 3 4
The area with the highest hazard.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 2 3
The area with the medium hazard.
Low False unspecified 0% low 0 2
The area with the lowest hazard.
Not exposed

Earthquake MMI scale

This scale, composed of increasing levels of intensity that range from imperceptible shaking to catastrophic destruction, is designated by Roman numerals. It does not have a mathematical basis; instead it is an arbitrary ranking based on observed effects. Note that fatality rates listed here are based on the active earthquake fatality model (currently set to ITB fatality model). Users can select the active earthquake fatality model in InaSAFE Options.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
X True 1.565% 100% extreme 9.5 10.5
Some well-built wooden structures destroyed; most masonry and frame structures destroyed with foundations. Rails bent.
IX True 0.373% 100% violent 8.5 9.5
Damage considerable in specially designed structures; well-designed frame structures thrown out of plumb. Damage great in substantial buildings, with partial collapse. Buildings shifted off foundations.
VIII True 0.089% 100% severe 7.5 8.5
Damage slight in specially designed structures; considerable damage in ordinary substantial buildings with partial collapse. Damage great in poorly built structures. Fall of chimneys, factory stacks, columns, monuments, walls. Heavy furniture overturned.
VII True 0.021% 100% very strong 6.5 7.5
Damage negligible in buildings of good design and construction; slight to moderate in well-built ordinary structures; considerable damage in poorly built or badly designed structures; some chimneys broken.
VI True 0.005% 100% strong 5.5 6.5
Felt by all, many frightened. Some heavy furniture moved; a few instances of fallen plaster. Damage slight.
V True 0.001% 0% moderate 4.5 5.5
Felt by nearly everyone; many awakened. Some dishes, windows broken. Unstable objects overturned. Pendulum clocks may stop.
IV True 2.87x10-04% 0% light 3.5 4.5
Felt indoors by many, outdoors by few during the day. At night, some awakened. Dishes, windows, doors disturbed; walls make cracking sound. Sensation like heavy truck striking building. Standing motor cars rocked noticeably.
III True 0% 0% weak 2.5 3.5
Felt quite noticeably by persons indoors, especially on upper floors of buildings. Many people do not recognize it as an earthquake. Standing motor cars may rock slightly. Vibrations similar to the passing of a truck. Duration estimated.
II True 0% 0% None or Null found from the data. 1.5 2.5
Felt only by a few persons at rest, especially on upper floors of buildings.
I False unspecified 0% not felt 0.5 1.5
Not felt except by a very few under especially favorable conditions.
Not exposed

Volcano

A volcano describes a mountain which has a vent through which rock fragments, ash, lava, steam and gases can be ejected from below the earth's surface. The type of material ejected depends on the type of volcano.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:
Notes for single events

No single event notes defined.

Notes for multi events / scenarios:

No multi-event notes defined.

Actions:

Units:

Name Plural Abbreviation Details

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard Name hazard_name Text 0
A NAME attribute in the hazard layer. This will be carried over to the impact layer if provided. The name can be useful in some cases e.g. where hazard is a known entity such as a volcano, the name can be used to label the place names.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Volcano classes

Three classes are supported for volcano vector hazard data: low, medium, or high.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% Kawasan Rawan Bencana III,high 0 3
The highest hazard class.
Medium True unspecified 100% Kawasan Rawan Bencana II,medium 3 5
The medium hazard class.
Low False unspecified 0% Kawasan Rawan Bencana I,low 5 10
The lowest hazard class.
Not exposed

Generic classes

A generic hazard is any dataset where the areas within the data set have been classified as either low, medium, or high hazard level. Use generic hazard in cases where InaSAFE does not have an existing hazard concept for the data you are using.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% high 3 4
The area with the highest hazard.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 2 3
The area with the medium hazard.
Low False unspecified 0% low 0 2
The area with the lowest hazard.
Not exposed

Volcanic ash

Volcanic ash describes fragments of pulverized rock, minerals and volcanic glass, ejected into the atmosphere during volcanic eruptions.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:
Notes for single events
Notes for multi events / scenarios:

No multi-event notes defined.

Actions:

Actions for exposure : Population

Units:

Name Plural Abbreviation Details
Centimetres centimetres cm Centimetres are a metric unit of measure. There are 100 centimetres in 1 metre.

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Ash classes

Five classes are supported for volcanic ash hazard data: very low, low, medium, high or very high.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
Very high True unspecified 100% very high 10 9999
Dry loading on buildings causing structural collapse.
High True unspecified 100% high 5 10
Dry loading on buildings causing structural damage but not collapse; wet loading on buildings (i.e. ash loading + heavy rainfall) causing structural collapse.
Medium True unspecified 0% medium 2 5
Damage to less vulnerable agricultural crops (e.g. tea plantations) and destruction of more vulnerable crops; destruction of critical infrastructure; cosmetic (non-structural) damage to buildings
Low True unspecified 0% low 0.1 2
Damage to transportation routes (e.g. airports, roads, railways); damage to critical infrastructure (e.g. electricity supply); damage to more vulnerable agricultural crops (e.g. rice fields)
Very low True unspecified 0% very low 0.01 0.1
Impact on health (respiration), livestock, and contamination of water supply.
Not exposed

Generic classes

A generic hazard is any dataset where the areas within the data set have been classified as either low, medium, or high hazard level. Use generic hazard in cases where InaSAFE does not have an existing hazard concept for the data you are using.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% high 3 4
The area with the highest hazard.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 2 3
The area with the medium hazard.
Low False unspecified 0% low 0 2
The area with the lowest hazard.
Not exposed

Cyclone

A Tropical Cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterised by a low-pressure centre, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. It is also referred to as hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean or typhoon in the North West Pacific Ocean.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:
Notes for single events

No single event notes defined.

Notes for multi events / scenarios:

No multi-event notes defined.

Actions:

Units:

Name Plural Abbreviation Details
mph mph mph The mile per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of statute miles covered in one hour.
km/h km/h km/h The kilometre per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of kilometres covered in one hour.
kn kn kn The knot is a unit of speed, expressing the number of nautical miles covered in one hour.
m/s m/s m/s The Metres per second is a unit of speed, expressing the number of metres covered in one second.

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Cyclone classes (AU - BOM)

Tropical cyclone intensity is classified using five classes according to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Tropical Cyclone intensity is defined as the maximum mean wind speed over open flat land or water, averaged over a 10-minute period. This is sometimes referred to as the maximum sustained wind and will be experienced around the eye-wall of the cyclone.

Citations:

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
Category 5 (severe tropical cyclone) True unspecified 100% cat 5,category 5
  • kilometres_per_hour : 283
  • knots : 153
  • metres_per_second : 79
  • miles_per_hour : 176
9999
Extremely dangerous with widespread destruction. A Category 5 cyclone's strongest winds are VERY DESTRUCTIVE winds with typical gusts over open flat land of more than 151 kt.
Category 4 (severe tropical cyclone) True unspecified 97% cat 4,category 4
  • kilometres_per_hour : 224
  • knots : 121
  • metres_per_second : 63
  • miles_per_hour : 140
  • kilometres_per_hour : 283
  • knots : 153
  • metres_per_second : 79
  • miles_per_hour : 176
Significant roofing loss and structural damage. Many caravans destroyed and blown away. Dangerous airborne debris . Widespread power failures. A Category 4 cyclone's strongest winds are VERY DESTRUCTIVE winds with typical gusts over open flat land of 122 - 151 kt.
Category 3 (severe tropical cyclone) True unspecified 55% cat 3,category 3
  • kilometres_per_hour : 167
  • knots : 90
  • metres_per_second : 47
  • miles_per_hour : 103
  • kilometres_per_hour : 224
  • knots : 121
  • metres_per_second : 63
  • miles_per_hour : 140
Some roof and structural damage. Some caravans destroyed. Power failures likely. A Category 3 cyclone's strongest winds are VERY DESTRUCTIVE winds with typical gusts over open flat land of 90 - 121 kt.
Category 2 (tropical cyclone) True unspecified 6% cat 2,category 2
  • kilometres_per_hour : 126
  • knots : 67
  • metres_per_second : 34
  • miles_per_hour : 77
  • kilometres_per_hour : 167
  • knots : 90
  • metres_per_second : 47
  • miles_per_hour : 103
Minor house damage. Significant damage to signs, trees and caravans. Heavy damage to some crops. Risk of power failure. Small craft may break moorings. A Category 2 cyclone's strongest winds are DESTRUCTIVE winds with typical gusts over open flat land of 68 - 89 kt.
Category 1 (tropical cyclone) True unspecified 0% cat 1,category 1
  • kilometres_per_hour : 90
  • knots : 49
  • metres_per_second : 24
  • miles_per_hour : 56
  • kilometres_per_hour : 126
  • knots : 67
  • metres_per_second : 34
  • miles_per_hour : 77
Negligible house damage. Damage to some crops, trees and caravans. Craft may drag moorings. A Category 1 cyclone's strongest winds are GALES with typical gusts over open flat land of 49 - 67 kt.
Tropical Depression False unspecified 0% tropical depression,no,false 0
  • kilometres_per_hour : 90
  • knots : 49
  • metres_per_second : 24
  • miles_per_hour : 56
A tropical depression is a tropical disturbance, that has a clearly defined surface circulation, which has maximum sustained winds of less than 34 kt.
Not exposed

Hurricane classes (SSHWS)

The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale is a 1 to 5 rating based on a hurricane's sustained wind speed, measured over a 1-minute period. This scale estimates potential property damage. Hurricanes reaching Category 3 and higher are considered major hurricanes because of their potential for significant loss of life and damage. Category 1 and 2 storms are still dangerous, however, and require preventative measures. In the western North Pacific, the term "super typhoon" is used for tropical cyclones with sustained winds exceeding 150 mph.

Citations:

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
Category 5 (major hurricane) True unspecified 100% cat 5,category 5
  • kilometres_per_hour : 337
  • knots : 183
  • metres_per_second : 94
  • miles_per_hour : 210
9999
Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.
Category 4 (major hurricane) True unspecified 99% cat 4,category 4
  • kilometres_per_hour : 279
  • knots : 151
  • metres_per_second : 77
  • miles_per_hour : 174
  • kilometres_per_hour : 337
  • knots : 183
  • metres_per_second : 94
  • miles_per_hour : 210
Catastrophic damage will occur: Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.
Category 3 (major hurricane) True unspecified 90% cat 3,category 3
  • kilometres_per_hour : 238
  • knots : 128
  • metres_per_second : 65
  • miles_per_hour : 148
  • kilometres_per_hour : 279
  • knots : 151
  • metres_per_second : 77
  • miles_per_hour : 174
Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.
Category 2 (hurricane) True unspecified 65% cat 2,category 2
  • kilometres_per_hour : 206
  • knots : 111
  • metres_per_second : 57
  • miles_per_hour : 128
  • kilometres_per_hour : 238
  • knots : 128
  • metres_per_second : 65
  • miles_per_hour : 148
Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.
Category 1 (hurricane) True unspecified 15% cat 1,category 1
  • kilometres_per_hour : 160
  • knots : 85
  • metres_per_second : 44
  • miles_per_hour : 99
  • kilometres_per_hour : 238
  • knots : 111
  • metres_per_second : 57
  • miles_per_hour : 128
Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.
No hurricane False unspecified 0% no,false 0
  • kilometres_per_hour : 160
  • knots : 85
  • metres_per_second : 44
  • miles_per_hour : 199
Winds less than Category 1 Hurricane
Not exposed

Generic classes

A generic hazard is any dataset where the areas within the data set have been classified as either low, medium, or high hazard level. Use generic hazard in cases where InaSAFE does not have an existing hazard concept for the data you are using.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% high 3 4
The area with the highest hazard.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 2 3
The area with the medium hazard.
Low False unspecified 0% low 0 2
The area with the lowest hazard.
Not exposed

Generic Hazard

A generic hazard can be used for any type of hazard where the data have been classified or generalised. For example: earthquake, flood, volcano, tsunami, landslide, smoke haze or strong wind. You can use the generic hazard functionality in InaSAFE to carry out an assessment for hazard data that are not explicitly supported yet in InaSAFE.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:
Notes for single events

No single event notes defined.

Notes for multi events / scenarios:

No multi-event notes defined.

Actions:

Units:

Name Plural Abbreviation Details

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Generic classes

A generic hazard is any dataset where the areas within the data set have been classified as either low, medium, or high hazard level. Use generic hazard in cases where InaSAFE does not have an existing hazard concept for the data you are using.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% high 3 4
The area with the highest hazard.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 2 3
The area with the medium hazard.
Low False unspecified 0% low 0 2
The area with the lowest hazard.
Not exposed

Dam Break

A Dam Break is a catastrophic type of failure characterized by the sudden, rapid, and uncontrolled release of impounded water as a result of structural failures or deficiencies in the dam. Dam Break can range from fairly minor to catastrophic, and can possibly harm human life and property downstream from the failure.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:
Notes for single events

No single event notes defined.

Notes for multi events / scenarios:

No multi-event notes defined.

Actions:

Units:

Name Plural Abbreviation Details
Feet feet ft Feet are an imperial unit of measure. There are 12 inches in 1 foot and 3 feet in 1 yard.
Metres metres m Metres are a metric unit of measure. There are 100 centimetres in 1 metre.
Generic generic generic A generic unit for value that does not have unit or we do not know about the unit. It also can be used for normalised values.

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Inundation classes

This type of classification refers to the division of flood areas based on the range of water levels. This area is divided into 3 areas of inundation including Inundation 1, Inundation 2, and Inundation 3.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
Inundation Class 3 True unspecified 1% Inundation 3 1.5 9999
High water level above ground surface.
Inundation Class 2 False unspecified 0% Inundation 2 0.6 1.5
Medium water level above ground surface.
Inundation Class 1 False unspecified 0% Inundation 1 0 0.6
Low water level above ground surface.
Not exposed

Generic classes

A generic hazard is any dataset where the areas within the data set have been classified as either low, medium, or high hazard level. Use generic hazard in cases where InaSAFE does not have an existing hazard concept for the data you are using.

Classes:

Name Affected Fatality rate Displacement rate Default values Default min Default max
High True unspecified 100% high 3 4
The area with the highest hazard.
Medium True unspecified 100% medium 2 3
The area with the medium hazard.
Low False unspecified 0% low 0 2
The area with the lowest hazard.
Not exposed

Exposure Concepts

Exposure

Exposure represents people, property, systems, or other elements present in hazard zones that are subject to potential losses in the event of a flood, earthquake, volcano etc.

Citations:

Land cover

The land cover exposure data describes features on the surface of the earth that might be exposed to a particular hazard. This might include crops, forest and urban areas.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:

Actions:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Exposure ID exposure_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the exposure layer A unique identifier for each exposure feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original exposure layer if needed.
Productivity Rate productivity_rate Whole number, Decimal number 0
The rate of productivity of crop land cover for each feature / area in hundred kilograms per hectare unit. "Productivity Rate" is defined as: The weight of a crop from land cover can produce per area unit. The unit is in hundred kilograms /hectare.. In case where land cover data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the productivity for each land cover area (exposure feature). The productivity is calculated based on the productivity rate multiplied by the area of the land cover.
Production Cost Rate production_cost_rate Whole number, Decimal number 0
The rate of production cost of a crop for each feature in currency per hectare unit. "Production Cost Rate" is defined as: The amount of money that is needed to build a crop land cover per area unit. The default unit is currency per area unit (e.g. IDR/hectare, USD/hectare).. In case where land cover data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the production cost for each land cover area (exposure feature). The production cost is calculated based on the production cost rate multiplied by the area of the land cover.
Production Value Rate production_value_rate Whole number, Decimal number 0
The rate of production value of a crop for each feature in currency per hectare unit. "Production Value Rate" is defined as: The price of a crop per area unit. The default unit is currency per area unit. (e.g. IDR/hectare, USD/hectare).. In case where land cover data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the production value for each land cover area (exposure feature). The production value is calculated based on the production value rate multiplied by the area of the land cover.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Generic Landcover Classification

Classification of landcover based on OSM.

Classes:

Name Default values
Residential residential,population
Predominantly houses or apartment buildings.
Industrial industrial
Predominantly workshops, factories or warehouses.
Retail retail
Predominantly shops.
Wood wood,forest
A forested area.
Farm farm,meadow
An area of farmland used for tillage and pasture (animals, vegetables, flowers, fruit growing).
Water water,lake
Water bodies both natural and man-made.
Other other
Any other land use type.

Badan Geologi Landcover Classification

Classification of landcover based on Badan Geologi

Citations:

Classes:

Name Default values
Settlement Permukiman dan Tempat Kegiatan,50102
Settlement
Rice Field Sawah,50306
Rice Field
Plantation Perkebunan / Kebun,50304
Plantation
Water Air Danau / Situ,Air Empang,Air Penggaraman,Air Tambak,Air Tawar Sungai,Air Waduk,Perairan Lainnya,50404,50420,50418,50416,50408,50406,50400
Water bodies
Forest Hutan Rimba,50202
Forest
Other other
Any other land use type.

Generic Data-driven Classification

Classification based on the content of the exposure dataset.

Classes:

Name Default values

Population

The population describes the people that might be exposed to a particular hazard.

Citations:

Notes:
General notes:

Citations:

Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:

Actions:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Exposure ID exposure_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the exposure layer A unique identifier for each exposure feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original exposure layer if needed.
Exposure Name exposure_name Text 0
A NAME attribute in the exposure layer. This will be carried over to the impact layer if provided. The name can be useful in some cases e.g. where exposure is a place, the name can be used to label the place names.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Roads

A road is defined as a route used by a vehicle or people to travel between two or more points.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:

Actions:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Exposure ID exposure_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the exposure layer A unique identifier for each exposure feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original exposure layer if needed.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Generic Road Classification

Classification of roads based on OSM.

Classes:

Name Default values
Motorway motorway link,motorway,trunk link,trunk
A road designed for fast moving traffic often with multiple lanes for each direction of traffic.
Primary primary link,primary road,primary
A road that provides the main transportation link, often over a long distance travel characteristic and supporting a high average velocity.
Secondary secondary link,secondary
A road that provides a transportation link for medium distance travel and medium average velocity.
Local local,tertiary link,tertiary,tertiary,unclassified
A road that provides a transportation link for a short distance travel and low average velocity.
Path cycleway,pedestrian,footway,path,track
A route for pedestrian and non-motorised transport.
Other living street,other,residential,road,service
A road that services residential or local traffic with low average velocity.

Generic Data-driven Classification

Classification based on the content of the exposure dataset.

Classes:

Name Default values

Places

A place is used to indicate that a particular location is known by a particular name.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:

Actions:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Exposure ID exposure_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the exposure layer A unique identifier for each exposure feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original exposure layer if needed.
Exposure Name exposure_name Text 0
A NAME attribute in the exposure layer. This will be carried over to the impact layer if provided. The name can be useful in some cases e.g. where exposure is a place, the name can be used to label the place names.
Population count population Whole number, Decimal number 0
During the impact analysis, population counts are used to calculate the total number of people, expected number of impacted, displaced people and in some cases fatality counts. Population data are also used to calculate demographic data (e.g. how many women, youths, adults etc. were affected) and minimum needs data (i.e. what quantities of provisions and supplies are needed to support displaced persons.) A count of the population for each feature.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Generic Place Classification

Classification of place based on OSM.

Classes:

Name Default values
City city
The largest urban settlements in the territory, normally including the national, state and provincial capitals.
Town town
A second tier urban settlement of local importance, often with a population of at least 10,000 people and good range of local facilities including schools, medical facilities etc. and traditionally a market.
Village village
A smaller distinct settlement, smaller than a town with few facilities available. People will typically travel to nearby towns to access facilities.
Hamlet hamlet
A smaller rural community typically with fewer than 100-200 inhabitants and minimal infrastructure.
Evacuation Centre evacuation centre,evacuation center,refuge,idp camp
Evacuation centres provide a place of temporary refuge for people evacuated from homes in the vicinity of a disaster and for people who may be travelling through the affected area but are unable to continue.
Airport airport
A complex of runways and buildings for the takeoff, landing, and maintenance of civil aircraft, with facilities for passengers.
Other other
Other

Generic Data-driven Classification

Classification based on the content of the exposure dataset.

Classes:

Name Default values

Structures

A structure can be any relatively permanent man made feature such as a building (an enclosed structure with walls and a roof), telecommunications facility or bridge.

Notes:
General notes:
Notes for continuous datasets:
Notes for classified datasets:

Actions:

Fields:

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Exposure ID exposure_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the exposure layer A unique identifier for each exposure feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original exposure layer if needed.
Hazard classifications

A hazard classification is used to define a range of severity thresholds (classes) for a hazard layer. The classification will be used to create zones of data that each present a similar hazard level. During the analysis, each exposure feature will be assessed to determine which hazard class it coincides with, and then a determination will be made as to whether and how the exposure feature is likely to be impacted by the hazard.

Generic Structure Classification

Classification of structure based on OSM.

Classes:

Name Default values
Residential dorm,house,residence,residential,apartments
A structure used to provide shelter for people.
Education college,education,kindergarten,school,university,university/college
A structure that provides a service in the education sector.
Health clinic,clinic/doctor,dentist,doctor,doctors,health,hospital,pharmacy
A structure that provides a service or facility in the health sector.
Transport aerodrome,airport,bus station,bus stop,ferry terminal,station,terminal,transportation
A structure that provides a service or facility in the transport sector.
Place of Worship place of worship - buddhist,place of worship - christian,place of worship - hindu,place of worship - islam,place of worship,church,mosque,temple,synagogue,worship
A structure or facility that is used for prayer or related religion activity.
Government government
A structure or facility that is used to provide a public service or other government activity.
Commercial accommodation,atm,bank,cafe,clothes,commercial,convenience,economy,fast food,hotel,industrial,mall,market,restaurant,seafood,shoes,shop,supermarket,tailor,warehouse,works
A structure or facility that is used for commercial or industrial purposes.
Recreation amusement arcade,cinema,museum,pitch,recreation and entertainment,sport centre,sport,sports facility,stadium,theatre,zoo
A structure or facility that is used for entertainment, sporting or recreation purposes.
Public Facility convention hall,fire station,library,police station,prison,public building,public facility,toilet,public
A structure or facility that provides a service or facility to the public including emergency services.
Evacuation Centre evacuation centre,evacuation center,refuge,idp camp
Evacuation centres provide a place of temporary refuge for people evacuated from homes in the vicinity of a disaster and for people who may be travelling through the affected area but are unable to continue.
Other animal boarding,garage,lighthouse,other,utility,water well,construction,yes
Any other structure frequently mapped.

Generic Data-driven Classification

Classification based on the content of the exposure dataset.

Classes:

Name Default values

InaSAFE Defaults

Name Default value Default min Default max Description
Youth Ratio Global Default 0.266 0 1 Default ratio of youths per 100 people in the total population.
Adult Ratio Global Default 0.657 0 1 Default ratio of adults per 100 people in the total population.
Elderly Ratio Global Default 0.077 0 1 Default ratio of elderly people per 100 people in the total population.
Female Ratio Global Default 0.496 0 1 Default ratio of females per 100 people in the total population.
Feature Rate Global Default 1000000 0 1000000000 Default value for feature rate per m²

Fields

Input dataset fields

Exposure fields

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Exposure ID exposure_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the exposure layer A unique identifier for each exposure feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original exposure layer if needed.

Hazard fields

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.

Aggregation fields

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Aggregation ID aggregation_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the aggregation layer. A unique identifier for each aggregation feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original aggregation layer if needed.
Aggregation Name aggregation_name Text 0
This will be carried over to the impact layer if provided. The name can be useful to label the area names that are used in the report generation process. A NAME attribute in the aggregation layer.

Output dataset fields

Impact fields

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Exposure ID exposure_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the exposure layer A unique identifier for each exposure feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original exposure layer if needed.
Exposure Class exposure_class Text 0
A CLASS attribute in the exposure layer. The class attribute will be used to group features according to their types. For example several types of ("secondary, residential") may be grouped into a single class ("other").
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard Class hazard_class Text 0
Classes are used to group values in a hazard dataset. In the context of a hazard, classes indicate the intensity of the hazard and are typically presented as "Low", "Medium", "High" etc. A CLASS attribute for the hazard.
Aggregation ID aggregation_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the aggregation layer. A unique identifier for each aggregation feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original aggregation layer if needed.
Aggregation Name aggregation_name Text 0
This will be carried over to the impact layer if provided. The name can be useful to label the area names that are used in the report generation process. A NAME attribute in the aggregation layer.
Feature Value exposure_value Decimal number 5
The value field is used to indicate the financial value of an exposed feature. The value is usually calculated as the function of the length or area of a given exposure feature. The VALUE field in a layer.
Feature Rate exposure_rate Decimal number 0
The rate field is used to indicate the financial value of an exposed feature. The rate, when multiplied by the of the length or area of a given exposure feature, can be used to calculate an estimated value of the feature. For example in buildings the rate * the area of a building can be used to estimate the value of the building. The rate field in a layer.
Female Ratio female_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of females for each feature. "Female" is defined as: Relating to the characteristics of women. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of females per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The female count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Youth Ratio youth_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of young people for each feature. "Youth" is defined as: A person aged between 0 and 14 years. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of youths per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The youth count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Adult Ratio adult_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of adults for each feature. "Adult" is defined as: Person aged between 15 and 64 years, usually of working age. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of adults per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The adult count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Elderly Ratio elderly_ratio Decimal number 2
The proportion of elderly people for each feature. "Elderly" is defined as: Persons aged 65 years and over. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of adults per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The elderly count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) ratios in the input analysis data.
Population count population Whole number, Decimal number 0
During the impact analysis, population counts are used to calculate the total number of people, expected number of impacted, displaced people and in some cases fatality counts. Population data are also used to calculate demographic data (e.g. how many women, youths, adults etc. were affected) and minimum needs data (i.e. what quantities of provisions and supplies are needed to support displaced persons.) A count of the population for each feature.
Female Count female Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of females for each feature. "Female" is defined as: Relating to the characteristics of women. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of females per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The female count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Male Count male Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of males for each feature. "Male" is defined as: Relating to the characteristics of men. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of males per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The male count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Youth Count youth Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of young people for each feature. "Youth" is defined as: A person aged between 0 and 14 years. This definition may not align well with the definition of youth in the humanitarian sector. It should be noted that this concept overlaps with the concepts of infant and child in InaSAFE. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of youths per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The youth count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Adult Count adult Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of adults for each feature. "Adult" is defined as: Person aged between 15 and 64 years, usually of working age. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of adults per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The adult count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Elderly Count elderly Whole number, Decimal number 0
The number of elderly people for each feature. "Elderly" is defined as: Persons aged 65 years and over. In cases where population data is available, InaSAFE will calculate the number of adults per exposure feature, aggregate hazard area, aggregation area and for the analysis area as a whole. The elderly count is calculated based on standard ratios either provided as a global setting in InaSAFE, or (if available) counts or ratios in the input analysis data.
Geometric Size size Decimal number 2
Attribute where the size of the geometry is located. Attribute where the size of the geometry is located.
Affected affected Text 0
The affected field indicates whether a feature is affected by the hazard. "Affected" is defined as: An exposure element (e.g. people, roads, buildings, land cover) that experiences a hazard (e.g. tsunami, flood, earthquake) and endures consequences (e.g. damage, evacuation, displacement, death) due to that hazard.
Total %s %s_exposure_count Decimal number 5
The total exposure count field stores the cumulative total number of exposed features or entities. The total exposure count field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of affected exposured features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.
Total total Decimal number 2
The total field stores the cumulative total number of features or entities. The total field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.

Aggregate hazard fields

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Aggregation ID aggregation_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the aggregation layer. A unique identifier for each aggregation feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original aggregation layer if needed.
Aggregation Name aggregation_name Text 0
This will be carried over to the impact layer if provided. The name can be useful to label the area names that are used in the report generation process. A NAME attribute in the aggregation layer.
Hazard ID hazard_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the hazard layer. A unique identifier for each hazard feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original hazard layer if needed.
Hazard Class hazard_class Text 0
Classes are used to group values in a hazard dataset. In the context of a hazard, classes indicate the intensity of the hazard and are typically presented as "Low", "Medium", "High" etc. A CLASS attribute for the hazard.
Total %s %s_exposure_count Decimal number 5
The total exposure count field stores the cumulative total number of exposed features or entities. The total exposure count field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of affected exposured features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.
Affected affected Text 0
The affected field indicates whether a feature is affected by the hazard. "Affected" is defined as: An exposure element (e.g. people, roads, buildings, land cover) that experiences a hazard (e.g. tsunami, flood, earthquake) and endures consequences (e.g. damage, evacuation, displacement, death) due to that hazard.
Total total Decimal number 2
The total field stores the cumulative total number of features or entities. The total field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.

Aggregation summary fields

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Aggregation ID aggregation_id Whole number 0
An ID attribute in the aggregation layer. A unique identifier for each aggregation feature. If you provide this we will persist these identifiers in the output datasets so that you can do a table join back to the original aggregation layer if needed.
Aggregation Name aggregation_name Text 0
This will be carried over to the impact layer if provided. The name can be useful to label the area names that are used in the report generation process. A NAME attribute in the aggregation layer.
Affected %s %s_affected Decimal number 5
The total affected field stores the cumulative total number of affected exposure features or entities. "Affected" is defined as: An exposure element (e.g. people, roads, buildings, land cover) that experiences a hazard (e.g. tsunami, flood, earthquake) and endures consequences (e.g. damage, evacuation, displacement, death) due to that hazard. The total affected field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of affected exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.
Total Affected total_affected Decimal number 2
The total affected field stores the cumulative total number of affected features or entities. "Affected" is defined as: An exposure element (e.g. people, roads, buildings, land cover) that experiences a hazard (e.g. tsunami, flood, earthquake) and endures consequences (e.g. damage, evacuation, displacement, death) due to that hazard. The total affected field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of affected exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.

Exposure summary table fields

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Exposure Class exposure_class Text 0
A CLASS attribute in the exposure layer. The class attribute will be used to group features according to their types. For example several types of ("secondary, residential") may be grouped into a single class ("other").
Total %s %s_hazard_count Decimal number 2
The total affected field stores the cumulative total number of affected exposure features or entities. "Hazard" is defined as: A hazard represents a natural process or phenomenon that may cause loss of life, injury or other health impacts, property damage, loss of livelihoods and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage. For example; flood, earthquake, tsunami and volcano are all examples of hazards. The hazard count field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of hazard features for each area.
Total Affected total_affected Decimal number 2
The total affected field stores the cumulative total number of affected features or entities. "Affected" is defined as: An exposure element (e.g. people, roads, buildings, land cover) that experiences a hazard (e.g. tsunami, flood, earthquake) and endures consequences (e.g. damage, evacuation, displacement, death) due to that hazard. The total affected field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of affected exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.
Total Not Affected total_not_affected Decimal number 2
The total not affected field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of not affected exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area. The total not affected field stores the cumulative total number of not affected features or entities.
Total Not Exposed total_not_exposed Decimal number 2
The total not exposed field stores the cumulative total number of not exposed features or entities. The total not exposed field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of not exposed exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.
Total total Decimal number 2
The total field stores the cumulative total number of features or entities. The total field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.

Analysis fields

Name Field Name Type Length Precision
Analysis Name analysis_name Text 0
This will be carried over to the analysis layer if provided. The name will provide context if the analysis layer is shared since the recipient of the layer will be able to tell what kind of analysis was carried out when generating the impact layer. For example when doing a flood on roads analysis, "flood on roads" will be written to the analysis name field in the analysis layer. A NAME attribute in the analysis layer.
Total %s %s_hazard_count Decimal number 2
The total affected field stores the cumulative total number of affected exposure features or entities. "Hazard" is defined as: A hazard represents a natural process or phenomenon that may cause loss of life, injury or other health impacts, property damage, loss of livelihoods and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage. For example; flood, earthquake, tsunami and volcano are all examples of hazards. The hazard count field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of hazard features for each area.
Total Affected total_affected Decimal number 2
The total affected field stores the cumulative total number of affected features or entities. "Affected" is defined as: An exposure element (e.g. people, roads, buildings, land cover) that experiences a hazard (e.g. tsunami, flood, earthquake) and endures consequences (e.g. damage, evacuation, displacement, death) due to that hazard. The total affected field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of affected exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.
Total Not Affected total_not_affected Decimal number 2
The total not affected field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of not affected exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area. The total not affected field stores the cumulative total number of not affected features or entities.
Total Not Exposed total_not_exposed Decimal number 2
The total not exposed field stores the cumulative total number of not exposed features or entities. The total not exposed field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of not exposed exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.
Total Exposed total_exposed Decimal number 2
The total exposed field stores the cumulative total number of exposed features or entities. The total exposed field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of exposed exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.
Total total Decimal number 2
The total field stores the cumulative total number of features or entities. The total field is added to the analysis layer, aggregate impact layer and aggregate hazard impact layer during the impact analysis. It represents the cumulative count of exposure features (e.g. buildings) or entities (e.g. people) for each area.

Layer Geometry Types

Vector

Point

A layer composed of points which each represent a feature on the earth. Currently the only point data supported by InaSAFE are volcano hazard layers and building points.

Line

A layer composed of linear features. Currently only road exposure line layers are supported by InaSAFE.

Polygon

A layer composed of polygon features that represent areas of hazard or exposure. For example areas of flood represented as polygons (for a hazard) or building footprints represented as polygons (for an exposure). The polygon layer will often need the presence of specific layer attributes too - these will vary depending on whether the layer represents a hazard, exposure or aggregation layer . Polygon layers can also be used for aggregation - where impact analysis results per boundary such as village or district boundaries.

Raster

Raster

A raster data layer consists of a matrix of cells organised into rows and columns. The value in the cells represents information such as a flood depth value or a hazard class.

Layer Modes

Data type

The data type describes the values in the layer. Values can be continuous or classified

Continuous

Continuous data can be used in raster hazard or exposure data where the values in the data are either integers or decimal values representing a continuously varying phenomenon. For example flood depth is a continuous value from 0 to the maximum reported depth during a flood.

Raster exposure data such as population data are also continuous. In this example the cell values represent the number of people in cell.

Raster data is considered to be continuous by default and you should explicitly indicate that it is classified if each cell in the raster represents a discrete class (e.g. low depth = 1, medium depth = 2, high depth = 3).

Classified

Classified data can be used for either hazard or exposure data and can be used for both raster and vector layer types where the attribute values represent a classified or coded value.

For example, classified values in a flood raster data set might represent discrete classes where a value of 1 might represent the low inundation class, a value of 2 might represent the medium inundation class and a value of 3 might represent the high inundation class.

Classified values in a vector (polygon) volcano data set might represent discrete classes where a value of I might represent low volcanic hazard, a value of II might represent medium volcanic hazard and a value of III might represent a high volcanic hazard.

Classified values in a vector exposure data set might include building type or road type.

Layer Purposes

Hazard

A hazard represents a natural process or phenomenon that may cause loss of life, injury or other health impacts, property damage, loss of livelihoods and services, social and economic disruption, or environmental damage. For example; flood, earthquake, tsunami and volcano are all examples of hazards.
UNISDR (2009) Terminology on disaster risk reduction.

Exposure

Exposure represents people, property, systems, or other elements present in hazard zones that are subject to potential losses in the event of a flood, earthquake, volcano etc.
UNISDR (2009) Terminology on disaster risk reduction.

Aggregation

An aggregation layer represents regions that can be used to summarise impact analysis results. For example, we might summarise the affected people after a flood according to administration boundaries.

Impact Analysis

This Impact Analysis contains all the results for the spatial analysis of the hazard, exposure and aggregation layers (if used) within the analysis extent. This layer is not created if the input includes a continuous raster exposure layer (eg population raster).

Hazard Aggregation Summary

An hazard aggregation summary is created during an InaSAFE analysis. This layer is a cross product between the hazard layer, the aggregate layer and the exposure summary layer. The layer geometries are firstly a union between the hazard layer and the aggregation layer. If the exposure is indivisible (e.g. building polygons) or point based (e.g. places, building points), the the aggregate hazard impacted layer will include a count of the number of features per intersected aggregate hazard polygon and, if applicable, either the length or the area of the exposure features contained within each polygon. If the exposure data is divisible (e.g. landcover polygons), those polygons will again be unioned with the output from the aggregation layer / hazard layer intersection process. As well as simple metrics of area or distance, additional columns will be writen to the aggregate hazard layer breaking down features by their classes and providing other similar metrics.

Aggregation Summary

This aggregation summary contains the analysis results for each exposure type by hazard type, summarised by aggregation area. Where an aggregation layer was not used; the analysis area is defined by the extent of the input layers or the 'analysis extent' set by the user.

Exposure Summary Table

This exposure summary table contains the analysis results for exposure type by hazard type, summarised by exposure type. It includes totals for affected and not affected status. It is used to generate reports and can be exported to a spreadsheet for further analysis.

Analysis Log

The analysis log contains information intended for developers and power users. The data in the analysis log can be sent to the developers of InaSAFE if you encounter long processing times. They will use the information to identify processing bottlenecks.

All Units

Name Plural Abbreviation Details
Feet feet ft Feet are an imperial unit of measure. There are 12 inches in 1 foot and 3 feet in 1 yard.
Generic generic generic A generic unit for value that does not have unit or we do not know about the unit. It also can be used for normalised values.
kg/m2 kg/m2 kg/m2 Kilograms per square metre is a metric unit of measure where the weight is specified according to area. This unit is relevant for hazards such as volcanic ash.
km/h km/h km/h The kilometre per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of kilometres covered in one hour.
mph mph mph The mile per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of statute miles covered in one hour.
kn kn kn The knot is a unit of speed, expressing the number of nautical miles covered in one hour.
m/s m/s m/s The Metres per second is a unit of speed, expressing the number of metres covered in one second.
Kilometres kilometres km Kilometres are a metric unit of measure. There are 1000 metres in 1 kilometre (km).
Metres metres m Metres are a metric unit of measure. There are 100 centimetres in 1 metre.
Millimetres millimetres mm Millimetres are a metric unit of measure. There are 1000 millimetres in 1 metre.
Centimetres centimetres cm Centimetres are a metric unit of measure. There are 100 centimetres in 1 metre.
Square Metres square metres Square Metres are a metric unit of measure.
Hectare hectares ha Hectare is an SI accepted metric system unit of area equal to 100 ares (10,000 m²) and primarily used in the measurement of land
MMI MMI MMI The Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) scale describes the intensity of ground shaking from a earthquake based on the effects observed by people at the surface.
Percentage percentages %% Percentage values ranges from 0 to 100. It represents a ratio of hundred.
Count Count Number of people (or any other exposure element) per pixel, building or area.

In a raster file, a pixel would have a value assigned to it representing the number (or count) of people in that pixel.

In a vector file, a value would be assigned to an object (e.g. a building or area) representing the number of people in that object.

Density Density # Number of people (or any other exposure element) per unit of area.

e.g. 35 people per km2

Unit Units # Exposure unit defines the unit for the exposure, for example people can either be measured as count or density (count per area.
Thousand Thousands # None or Null found from the data.
Million Millions # None or Null found from the data.
Billion Billions # None or Null found from the data.
Trillion Trillions # None or Null found from the data.

Post Processors

Post Processor Input Types

Name Description
constant This type of input takes a constant value.
field This type of input takes a value from a field.
dynamic_field This type of input takes value from a dynamic field. It will require some additional parameter details.
keyword This type of input takes value from a keyword for the layer being handled.
needs_profile This type of input takes a value from current InaSAFE minimum needs profile.
geometry_property This type of input takes a value from the geometry property.
layer_property This type of input takes it's value from a layer property. For example the layer Coordinate Reference System of the layer.

Post Processor Input Values

Name Description
size_calculator This is a value for the layer_property input type. It retrieves Size Calculator of the layer CRS
layer_crs This is a value for layer_property input type. It retrieves the layer Coordinate Reference System (CRS).
layer_property This type of input takes it's value from a layer property. For example the layer Coordinate Reference System of the layer.

Post Processor Process Types

Name Description
formula This type of process is a formula which is interpreted and executed by the post processor.
function This type of process takes inputs as arguments and processes them by passing them to a Python function.

Post Processors

Name Input Fields Output Fields
Size Value Post Processor
  • geometry
  • size_calculator
  • Geometric Size function. : size (Simple postprocessor where we compute the size of a feature. :param geometry: The geometry. :type geometry: QgsGeometry :param size_calculator: The size calculator. :type size_calculator: safe.gis.vector.tools.SizeCalculator :return: The size. )
A post processor to calculate the size of the feature. The unit is defined in the exposure definition.
Affected Post Processor
  • classification
  • exposure
  • hazard
  • hazard_class
  • Affected function. : post_processor_affected_function (Private function used in the affected postprocessor. It returns a boolean if it's affected or not, or not exposed. :param exposure: The exposure to use. :type exposure: str :param hazard: The hazard to use. :type hazard: str :param classification: The hazard classification to use. :type classification: str :param hazard_class: The hazard class of the feature. :type hazard_class: str :return: If this hazard class is affected or not. It can be `not exposed`. The not exposed value returned is the key defined in `hazard_classification.py` at the top of the file. :rtype: bool,'not exposed' )
A post processor to determine if a feature is affected or not (according to the hazard classification). It can be "not exposed".
Population Fatality Ratio Post Processor
  • classification
  • earthquake_hazard
  • hazard_class
  • population
  • population_exposure
  • Fatality Ratio function. : post_processor_population_fatality_function (Private function used in the fatality postprocessor. :param classification: The hazard classification to use. :type classification: str :param hazard_class: The hazard class of the feature. :type hazard_class: str :param population: We don't use this value here. It's only used for condition for the postprocessor to run. :type population: float, int :return: The displacement ratio for a given hazard class. :rtype: float )
A post processor to add the population fatality ratio according to the hazard class. Only the MMI classification has a fatality model.
Fatalities Post Processor
  • fatality_ratio
  • population
  • population_exposure
  • Fatalities formula. : population * fatality_ratio
A post processor to calculate the number of fatalities.
Population Displacement Ratio Post Processor
  • classification
  • hazard
  • hazard_class
  • population
  • population_exposure
  • Population Displacement Ratio function. : post_processor_population_displacement_function (Private function used in the displacement postprocessor. :param hazard: The hazard to use. :type hazard: str :param classification: The hazard classification to use. :type classification: str :param hazard_class: The hazard class of the feature. :type hazard_class: str :param population: We don't use this value here. It's only used for condition for the postprocessor to run. :type population: float, int :return: The displacement ratio for a given hazard class. :rtype: float )
A post processor to add the population displacement ratio according to the hazard class
Displaced Post Processor
  • displacement_ratio
  • fatalities
  • population
  • population_exposure
  • Displaced formula. : (population - fatalities) * displacement_ratio
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced people. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Distance Post Processor
  • distance_calculator
  • earthquake_hazard
  • latitude
  • longitude
  • place_exposure
  • place_geometry
  • Distance function. : calculate_distance (Simple postprocessor where we compute the distance between two points. :param distance_calculator: The size calculator. :type distance_calculator: safe.gis.vector.tools.SizeCalculator :param latitude: The latitude to use. :type latitude: float :param longitude: The longitude to use. :type longitude: float :param place_geometry: Geometry of place. :type place_geometry: QgsGeometry :param earthquake_hazard: The hazard to use. :type earthquake_hazard: str :param place_exposure: The exposure to use. :type place_exposure: str :return: distance :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the distance between two points.
Bearing Angle Post Processor
  • earthquake_hazard
  • latitude
  • longitude
  • place_exposure
  • place_geometry
  • Bearing Angle function. : calculate_bearing (Simple postprocessor where we compute the bearing angle between two points. :param place_geometry: Geometry of place. :type place_geometry: QgsGeometry :param latitude: The latitude to use. :type latitude: float :param longitude: The longitude to use. :type longitude: float :param earthquake_hazard: The hazard to use. :type earthquake_hazard: str :param place_exposure: The exposure to use. :type place_exposure: str :return: Bearing angle :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the bearing angle between two points.
Cardinality Post Processor
  • angle
  • earthquake_hazard
  • place_exposure
  • Direction function. : calculate_cardinality (Simple postprocessor where we compute the cardinality of an angle. :param angle: Bearing angle. :type angle: float :param earthquake_hazard: The hazard to use. :type earthquake_hazard: str :param place_exposure: The exposure to use. :type place_exposure: str :return: Cardinality text. :rtype: str )
A post processor to calculate the cardinality of an angle.
Male Post Processor
  • male_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Male Displaced Count formula. : population_displaced * male_ratio
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced males."Male" is defined as: Relating to the characteristics of men.. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Female Post Processor
  • female_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Female Displaced Count formula. : population_displaced * female_ratio
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced females."Female" is defined as: Relating to the characteristics of women.. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Weekly Hygiene Packs Post Processor
  • female_displaced
  • hygiene_packs_ratio
  • population_exposure
  • Weekly Hygiene Packs function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate needed hygiene packs weekly for women who are displaced. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Infant Post Processor
  • infant_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Infant Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced infant. "Infant" is defined as: A very young child or baby aged between 0 and 4 years. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Child Post Processor
  • child_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Child Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced child. "Child" is defined as: A young person aged between 5 and 14 years, usually below the age of puberty. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Youth Post Processor
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • youth_ratio
  • Youth Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced youth. "Youth" is defined as: A person aged between 0 and 14 years. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Adult Post Processor
  • adult_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Adult Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced adults. "Adult" is defined as: Person aged between 15 and 64 years, usually of working age.. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Elderly Post Processor
  • elderly_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Elderly Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced elderly people. "Elderly" is defined as: Persons aged 65 years and over.. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Taco Post Processor
  • amount
  • population
  • Taco function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A displaced person should be provided with 100.0 piece/ pieces/ NULL of Taco. Though no less than 0.0 and no more than 100.0. This should be provided weekly.
Under 5 Years Old Post Processor
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • under_5_ratio
  • Under 5 Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced under 5 years old. "Under 5 Years Old" is defined as: Persons aged under 5 years. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Over 60 Years Old Post Processor
  • over_60_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Over 60 Years Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced over 60 years old. "Over 60 Years Old" is defined as: Persons aged 60 years and over. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Disability Vulnerability Post Processor
  • over_60_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Disabled Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced people who are especially vulnerable because they have disabilities. "Disabled" is defined as: A person having a physical or mental condition that limits their movements, senses, or activities.. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Child Bearing Age Post Processor
  • child_bearing_age_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Child Bearing Age Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced child bearing age. "Child Bearing Age" is defined as: The span of ages (usually 15-49) at which individuals are capable of becoming parents. The phrase can be applied to men and women but most frequently refers to women. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Pregnant Post Processor
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • pregnant_ratio
  • Lactating Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced pregnant women. "Pregnant" is defined as: A female having a child developing in the uterus. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Lactating Women Post Processor
  • lactating_lactating_ratio
  • population_displaced
  • population_exposure
  • Pregnant Displaced Count function. : multiply (Simple postprocessor where we multiply the input values. :param kwargs: Dictionary of values to multiply :type kwargs: dict :return: The result. :rtype: float )
A post processor to calculate the number of displaced lactating women. "Lactating" is defined as: A female producing milk to feed a baby. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.
Productivity Post Processor
  • productivity_rate
  • size
  • Productivity formula. : productivity_rate * size
A post processor to calculate the productivity for each feature.
Production Cost Post Processor
  • production_cost_rate
  • size
  • Production Cost formula. : production_cost_rate * size
A post processor to calculate the production cost for each feature
Production Value Post Processor
  • production_value_rate
  • size
  • Production Value formula. : production_value_rate * size
A post processor to calculate the production value for each feature
Additional Weekly Rice kg for Pregnant and Lactating Women Post Processor
  • additional_rice_ratio
  • lactating_displaced
  • pregnant_displaced
  • Additional Weekly Rice kg for Pregnant and Lactating Women formula. : (pregnant_displaced + lactating_displaced) * additional_rice_ratio
A post processor to calculate additional rice for pregnant and lactating women who are displaced. "Displaced" is defined as: Displaced people are people who, for different reasons and circumstances because of risk or disaster, have to leave their place of residence. In InaSAFE, demographic and minimum needs reports are based on displaced / evacuated people.

Reporting

Note: This section of the help documentation is intended for advanced users who want to modify reports which are produced by InaSAFE.

Overview

Whenever InaSAFE completes an analysis, it will automatically generate a number of reports. Some of these reports are based on templates that are shipped with InaSAFE, and can be customised or over-ridden by creating your own templates. The following reports are produced in InaSAFE:

Name Customisable? Example Description
Infographic report Yes Only generated for cases where the exposure dataset is population, the infographic report provides a visual "at a glance" overview of the impacts population. It uses the Indonesian minimum needs profile, so users in other countries should probably implement a customised version of this report which caters for their local minimum needs profile.
Impact report No The impact report provides a tabular overview of the analysis including details of the analysis question, the general report, the minimum needs and other demographic breakdowns (when exposure is population), a list of notes and assumptions and basic details of the datasets used in the analysis.
Portrait map Yes A standard map report is produced in a portrait layout for this report. We provide both portrait and landscape layouts so that the reports can accommodate different shapes of reporting area. The master template for this report is found in the InaSAFE plugin directory under "resources/qgis-composer-templates/inasafe-map-report-portrait.qpt". If you make a copy of this report to your "/.qgis2/inasafe" directory, you can edit this copy and override the default layout and content options provided by InaSAFE. See also the manual for details about expressions and composer elements that you can use in your reports. In addition to this basic override mechanism, you can provide hazard / exposure specific variants of this template by using the following path and naming convention: "(home)/.qgis2/inasafe/inasafe-map-report-portrait-(hazard)-(exposure).qpt" (where (home) is replaced by the path to your home directory, (hazard) by the class of hazard, and (exposure) by the class of exposure).
Landscape map Yes A standard map report is produced in a landscape layout. We provide both portrait and landscape layouts so that the reports can accommodate different shapes of reporting area. The master template for this report is found in the InaSAFE plugin directory under "resources/qgis-composer-templates/inasafe-map-report-landscape.qpt". If you make a copy of this report to your "/.qgis2/inasafe" directory, you can edit this copy and override the default layout and content options provided by InaSAFE. See also the manual for details about expressions and composer elements that you can use in your reports. In addition to this basic override mechanism, you can provide hazard / exposure specific variants of this template by using the following path and naming convention: "(home)/.qgis2/inasafe/inasafe-map-report-landscape-(hazard)-(exposure).qpt" (where (home) is replaced by the path to your home directory, (hazard) by the class of hazard, and (exposure) by the class of exposure).
Action checklist No The action checklist report provides a list of actions for the DRR practitioner to be aware of or think about. These include general items such as "how will warnings be disseminated?" and specific items such as things that relate to displaced people if the exposure of the analysis is population.
Analysis provenance No When providing a report generated by InaSAFE to a decision make, it is important that there is accompanying information that describes which datasets were used, what settings were used, and so on. The provenance report is designed to address this need by providing detailed technical information about the analysis.

In the sections that follow, we provide more technical information about the custom QGIS Expressions and special template elements that can be used to customise your templates.

QGIS Expressions

InaSAFE adds a number of expressions that can be used to conveniently obtain provenance data to the active analysis results. The expressions can also be used elsewhere in QGIS as needed..

Name Description
action_checklist_report

Retrieve the action checklist section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • action_checklist_report()

additional_minimum_needs_section_header_element

Retrieve additional minimum needs section header string from definition.


Examples:



  • additional_minimum_needs_section_header_element()

age_gender_section_header_element

Retrieve age gender section header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • age_gender_section_header_element()

age_gender_section_notes_element

Retrieve age gender section notes string from definitions.


Examples:



  • age_gender_section_notes_element()

aggregation_not_used_text_element

Retrieve reference title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • aggregation_not_used_text_element()

aggregation_postprocessors_report

Retrieve the aggregation postprocessors section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • aggregation_postprocessors_report()

aggregation_result_report

Retrieve the aggregation result section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • aggregation_result_report()

analysis_detail_report

Retrieve the analysis detail section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • analysis_detail_report()

analysis_provenance_details_report

Retrieve the analysis provenance details section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • analysis_provenance_details_report()

analysis_question_report

Retrieve the analysis question section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • analysis_question_report()

analysis_summary_report

Retrieve an HTML table report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • analysis_summary_report()

analysis_title_header_element

Retrieve analysis title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • analysis_title_header_element()

bearing_to_nearest_place

If the impact layer has a distance field, it will return the bearing to the nearest place in degrees.


Examples:



  • bearing_to_nearest_place() → 280

beautify_date

Given an InaSAFE analysis time, it will convert it to a date with year-month-date format.


Examples:



  • beautify_date( @start_datetime ) → will convert datetime provided by qgis_variable.

beautify_time

Given an InaSAFE analysis time, it will convert it to a time with hour:minute format.


Examples:



  • beautify_date( @start_datetime ) → will convert datetime provided by qgis_variable.

caution_text_element

Retrieve caution text string from definitions.


Examples:



  • caution_text_element()

caution_title_header_element

Retrieve caution title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • caution_title_header_element()

crs_text_element

Retrieve coordinate reference system text string from definitions.


Examples:



  • crs_text_element('EPSG:3857') → Coordinate Reference System - WGS 84 / Pseudo Mercator

default_inasafe_html_resources

Retrieve default InaSAFE HTML resources (style and script) from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • inasafe_html_resources()

direction_to_nearest_place

If the impact layer has a distance field, it will return the direction to the nearest place.


Examples:



  • direction_to_nearest_place() → NW

disclaimer_text_element

Retrieve disclaimer text string from definitions.


Examples:



  • disclaimer_text_element()

disclaimer_title_header_element

Retrieve disclaimer title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • disclaimer_title_header_element()

distance_to_nearest_place

If the impact layer has a distance field, it will return the distance to the nearest place in metres.


Examples:



  • distance_to_nearest_place() → 1234

female_vulnerability_section_header_element

Retrieve female vulnerability section header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • female_vulnerability_section_header_element()

general_report

Retrieve the general report section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • general_report()

hazard_extra_keyword

Given a keyword, it will return the value of the keyword from the hazard layer's extra keywords.


Examples:



  • hazard_extra_keyword( 'depth' ) → will return the value of 'depth' in current hazard layer's extra keywords


Available keywords:



  • earthquake_x_minimum → The minimum value of x coordinate of the shakemaps. It indicates the extent of the event.

  • volcano_alert_level → This information shows the estimated severity level of the model. It is usually a choice between Normal, Advisory, Watch, or Warning.

  • analysis_type → Analysis type

  • earthquake_magnitude → The magnitude of the earthquake in Richter scale.

  • volcano_height → The height of the vent of a volcano. It is calculated from the sea level in metres.

  • flood_event_time → The time of the flood event.

  • volcano_eruption_height → The ash column height. It is calculated from the vent of the volcano in metres.

  • flood_event_id → The ID of the flood event. It is constructed from the timestamp of the flood in YYYYMMDDHH-[extra information]. The extra information can be a period and the region level, for example 6-province that represent 6 hours period and province level.

  • earthquake_x_maximum → The maximum value of x coordinate of the shakemaps. It indicates the extent of the event.

  • volcano_latitude → The latitude of the volcano.

  • earthquake_latitude → The latitude of the earthquake epicentre.

  • earthquake_event_time → The time of the earthquake happen.

  • volcano_name → The name of the volcano.

  • earthquake_longitude → The longitude of the earthquake epicentre.

  • volcano_longitude → The longitude of the volcano.

  • earthquake_y_maximum → The maximum value of y coordinate of the shakemaps. It indicates the extent of the event.

  • earthquake_event_id → The ID of the earthquake event or shakemap. It is constructed from the timestamp of the event in YYYYMMDDHHmmSS format.

  • earthquake_description → Additional description of the earthquake event.

  • volcano_forecast_duration → The duration in which the volcanic ash model is valid. It is calculated after the model is generated and the value varies between 1 day or 3 day(s). After this duration, the forecast information in the model is expired.

  • time_zone → Time zone

  • earthquake_source → Source of the earthquake, it can be initial or post-processed (data-informed).

  • earthquake_y_minimum → The minimum value of y coordinate of the shakemaps. It indicates the extent of the event.

  • earthquake_location → The location information of the earthquake event. It usually refers to the nearest city in the location.

  • volcano_event_id → The ID of the volcano eruption. It is constructed from YYYYMMDDHHmm[zoneoffset]_[volcano_name]. YYYYMMDDHHmm is the format of the eruption event time. [zone offset] is the offset of its time zone. [volcano_name] is the name of the volcano. For example: 201712012200+0800_Agung

  • volcano_eruption_event_time → The time of the eruption of the volcano.

  • earthquake_depth → The depth of earthquake epicentre in kilometre unit.

inasafe_analysis_summary_field_value

Retrieve a value from a field in the analysis summary layer.


Examples:



  • inasafe_analysis_summary_field_value('total_not_exposed') → 3

inasafe_exposure_summary_field_values

Retrieve all values from a field in the exposure summary layer.


Examples:



  • inasafe_exposure_summary_field_values('exposure_name') → ['jakarta']

inasafe_field_header

Retrieve a header name of the field name from definitions.


Examples:



  • inasafe_field_header('minimum_needs__clean_water') → Clean water

inasafe_logo_black_path

Retrieve the full path of inasafe-logo-black.svg


Examples:



  • inasafe_logo_black_path()

inasafe_logo_white_path

Retrieve the full path of inasafe-logo-white.svg.


Examples:



  • inasafe_logo_white_path()

inasafe_place_value_coefficient

Given a number, it will return the coefficient of the place value name. It needs to be used with inasafe_number_denomination_unit.


Examples:



  • inasafe_place_value_coefficient(1700) → 1.7

  • inasafe_place_value_coefficient(10) → 1

inasafe_place_value_name

Given a number, it will return the place value name. It needs to be used with inasafe_place_value_coefficient.


Examples:



  • inasafe_place_value_name(1700) → Thousand

  • inasafe_place_value_name(10) → Ten

inasafe_place_value_percentage

Given a number and total, it will return the percentage of the number to the total.


Examples:



  • inasafe_place_value_percentage(50,100) → 50.0%

  • inasafe_place_value_percentage(inasafe_analysis_summary_field_value('female_displaced'), inasafe_analysis_summary_field_value('displaced')) → will calculate the percentage of female displaced count to total displaced count.

inasafe_sub_analysis_summary_field_value

Retrieve a value from a field in the sub analysis summary layer from a multi exposure analysis layer.


Examples:



  • inasafe_sub_analysis_summary_field_value('population', 'total_not_exposed') → 3

infographic_header_element

Get a formatted infographic header sentence for an impact function.


Examples:



  • infographic_header_element('flood') → Estimated impact of a flood

information_title_header_element

Retrieve information title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • information_title_header_element()

land_cover_analysis_summary_report

Retrieve an HTML land cover analysis table report from a multi exposure analysis.


Examples:



  • land_cover_analysis_summary_report()

legend_title_header_element

Retrieve legend title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • legend_title_header_element()

map_overview_header_element

Retrieve map overview header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • map_overview_header_element()

minimum_needs_report

Retrieve the minimum needs section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • minimum_needs_report()

minimum_needs_section_header_element

Retrieve minimum needs section header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • minimum_needs_section_header_element()

minimum_needs_section_notes_element

Retrieve minimum needs section notes string from definitions.


Examples:



  • minimum_needs_section_notes_element()

minimum_needs_unit

Retrieve units of the given minimum needs field name.


Examples:



  • minimum_needs_unit('minimum_needs__clean_water') → l/weekly

mmi_detail_report

Retrieve the mmi detail section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • mmi_detail_report()

multi_exposure_analysis_summary_report

Retrieve an HTML multi exposure analysis table report.


Examples:



  • multi_exposure_analysis_summary_report()

name_of_the_nearest_place

If the impact layer has a distance field, it will return the name of the nearest place.


Examples:



  • name_of_the_nearest_place() → Tokyo

north_arrow_path

Retrieve the full path of user specified north arrow image. If the custom north arrow logo is not found, it will return the default north arrow image.


Examples:



  • north_arrow_path()

notes_assumptions_report

Retrieve the notes assumptions section from InaSAFE analysis report of current selected analysis.


Examples:



  • notes_assumptions_report()

organisation_logo_path

Retrieve the full path of user specified organisation logo. If the custom organisation logo is not found, it will return the default organisation logo.


Examples:



  • organisation_logo_path()

people_section_header_element

Retrieve people section header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • people_section_header_element()

place_analysis_summary_report

Retrieve an HTML place analysis table report from a multi exposure analysis.


Examples:



  • place_analysis_summary_report()

population_analysis_summary_report

Retrieve an HTML population analysis table report from a multi exposure analysis.


Examples:



  • population_analysis_summary_report()

population_chart_header_element

Retrieve population chart header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • population_chart_header_element()

reference_title_header_element

Retrieve reference title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • reference_title_header_element()

road_analysis_summary_report

Retrieve an HTML road analysis table report from a multi exposure analysis.


Examples:



  • road_analysis_summary_report()

source_title_header_element

Retrieve source title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • source_title_header_element()

structure_analysis_summary_report

Retrieve an HTML structure analysis table report from a multi exposure analysis.


Examples:



  • structure_analysis_summary_report()

time_title_header_element

Retrieve time title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • time_title_header_element()

unknown_source_text_element

Retrieve reference title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • unknown_source_text_element()

version_title_header_element

Retrieve version title header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • version_title_header_element()

vulnerability_section_header_element

Retrieve vulnerability section header string from definitions.


Examples:



  • vulnerability_section_header_element()

Composer Elements

InaSAFE looks for elements with specific id's on the composer page and replaces them with InaSAFE specific content.

ID Description
people-section-notes If used, the element-id "people-section-notes" in the composer layout will be replaced by text explaining the different groups of people reported on (displaced, exposed, etc.).
population-chart-legend If used, the element-id "population-chart-legend" in the composer layout will be replaced by a chart illustrating the number of people in different groups (displaced, exposed, etc.).

Developer Guide

This section of the help documentation is intended for advanced users who want to modify the internals of InaSAFE. It assumes that you have basic coding skills. All examples are in python unless otherwise stated.

Defining a new hazard type

Background

In the previous versions of InaSAFE, we spent a lot of effort building one impact function per hazard/exposure combination (and sometimes multiple impact functions per combination). In our new architecture, we try to deal with everything in the same way - by following a standardized process of converting the hazard dataset into a classified polygon layer and then calculating the impacted and affected areas using a standard work-flow. A simplified version of this work-flow is described in illustration 1.

Because of this change, you will no longer see an impact function selector in the dock widget and there are no longer any 'impact function options' as we had in previous versions of InaSAFE. In the new system, almost all configuration is managed through metadata (created using the keywords wizard).

Also, in all versions prior to Version 4.0, we made heavy use of interpolation in order to determine whether buildings or other exposure layers are impacted. While this is a commonly used technique in GIS, it often leads to non - intuitive looking reports. Under our new architecture, we always use geometric overlay operations to make a determination whether an exposure feature is affected or not. The implication of this is that we produce intuitive and easily verifiable impact layers. You can see an example in Illustration 2.

Stepping away from the two previously mentioned paradigms allows us to simply add new hazard types to the metadata driven impact function by adding new metadata types to the InaSAFE sources. In the next chapter we show you how this was achieved and how it can be repeated for further hazards using the example of tropical cyclones.

Adding a new hazard

The whole work needed can be looked at in Pull Request #3539 . Please bear in mind that the paths of the files are now safe/definitions/xxx.py and not safe/definitionsv4/xxx.py since v4 is the default codebase. In the next sections we will show each file that needs to be extended in order to add a new hazard type.

safe/definitions/units.py

If you are adding an hazard that uses units that are not yet known to InaSAFE, you need to define them in units.py

unit_kilometres_per_hour = {
    'key': 'kilometres_per_hour',
    'name': tr('km/h'),
    'plural_name': tr('km/h'),
    'measure': tr('Speed'),
    'abbreviation': tr('km/h'),
    'description': tr(
        'The kilometre per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the '
        'number of kilometres covered in one hour.'),
    'citations': [
        {
            'text': None,
            'link': None
        }
    ]
}

safe/definitions/colors.py

If you are adding an hazard that has more classes than any other hazards you’ll need to add additional colors for the additional classes in colors.py. You might also define other colors if you don't want to use the standard colors. For the sake of homogeneous map reports, this addition should not be taken lightly.

very_dark_red = Qcolor('#710017')

safe/definitions/hazard_classifications.py

Add the classifications you want to make available for your new hazard type. You can add as many classes as you want in the classes list.

Also, a classification can support multiple units so you don't have to define different classifications just to have the same classification in two or more different units. These are defined in the multiple_units attribute of the classification.

cyclone_au_bom_hazard_classes = {
    'key': 'cyclone_au_bom_hazard_classes',
    'name': tr('Cyclone classes (AU - BOM)'),
    'description': tr(
        'Tropical cyclone intensity is classified using five classes '
        'according to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Tropical Cyclone '
        'intensity is defined as the maximum mean wind speed over open flat '
        'land or water, averaged over a 10-minute period. This is sometimes '
        'referred to as the maximum sustained wind and will be experienced '
        'around the eye-wall of the cyclone.'),
    'type': hazard_classification_type,
    'citations': [
        {
            'text': tr(
                'Australian Bureau of Meteorology - Tropical Cyclone '
                'Intensity and Impacts'),
            'link':
                u'http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/about/intensity.shtml#WindC'
        },
        {
            'text': tr('Tropical cyclone scales - wikpedia'),
            'link': u'https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropical_cyclone_scales'
                    u'#Australia_and_Fiji'
        }
    ],
    'multiple_units': [
        unit_miles_per_hour,
        unit_kilometres_per_hour,
        unit_knots,
        unit_metres_per_second],
    'classes': [
        {
            'key': 'category_5',
            'value': 5,
            'color': very_dark_red,
            'name': tr('Category 5 (severe tropical cyclone)'),
            'affected': True,
            'description': tr(
                'Extremely dangerous with widespread destruction. A Category '
                '5 cyclone\'s strongest winds are VERY DESTRUCTIVE winds with '
                'typical gusts over open flat land of more than 151 kt. '
            ),
            'fatality_rate': None,
            'displacement_rate': 1.0,
            'numeric_default_min': {
                unit_knots['key']: 153,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 79,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 176,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 283
            },
            'numeric_default_max': big_number,
            'string_defaults': ['cat 5', 'category 5'],
            'citations': [
                {
                    'text': tr(
                        'Displacement rate is a generalized estimate ('
                        'personal communication Craig Arthur)'),
                    'link': u'https://github.com/inasafe/inasafe/issues/3762'
                            u'#issuecomment-283839365'
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            'key': 'category_4',
            'value': 4,
            'color': dark_red,
            'name': tr('Category 4 (severe tropical cyclone)'),
            'affected': True,
            'description': tr(
                'Significant roofing loss and structural damage. Many '
                'caravans destroyed and blown away. Dangerous airborne debris '
                '. Widespread power failures. A Category 4 cyclone\'s '
                'strongest winds are VERY DESTRUCTIVE winds with typical '
                'gusts over open flat land of 122 - 151 kt. '
            ),
            'fatality_rate': None,
            'displacement_rate': 0.97,
            'numeric_default_min': {
                unit_knots['key']: 121,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 63,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 140,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 224
            },
            'numeric_default_max': {
                unit_knots['key']: 153,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 79,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 176,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 283
            },
            'string_defaults': ['cat 4', 'category 4'],
            'citations': [
                {
                    'text': tr(
                        'Displacement rate is a generalized estimate ('
                        'personal communication Craig Arthur)'),
                    'link': u'https://github.com/inasafe/inasafe/issues/3762'
                            u'#issuecomment-283839365'
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            'key': 'category_3',
            'value': 3,
            'color': red,
            'name': tr('Category 3 (severe tropical cyclone)'),
            'affected': True,
            'description': tr(
                'Some roof and structural damage. Some caravans destroyed. '
                'Power failures likely. A Category 3 cyclone\'s strongest '
                'winds are VERY DESTRUCTIVE winds with typical gusts over '
                'open flat land of 90 - 121 kt. '
            ),
            'fatality_rate': None,
            'displacement_rate': 0.55,
            'numeric_default_min': {
                unit_knots['key']: 90,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 47,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 103,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 167
            },
            'numeric_default_max': {
                unit_knots['key']: 121,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 63,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 140,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 224
            },
            'string_defaults': ['cat 3', 'category 3'],
            'citations': [
                {
                    'text': tr(
                        'Displacement rate is a generalized estimate ('
                        'personal communication Craig Arthur)'),
                    'link': u'https://github.com/inasafe/inasafe/issues/3762'
                            u'#issuecomment-283839365'
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            'key': 'category_2',
            'value': 2,
            'color': orange,
            'name': tr('Category 2 (tropical cyclone)'),
            'affected': True,
            'description': tr(
                'Minor house damage. Significant damage to signs, trees '
                'and caravans. Heavy damage to some crops. Risk of '
                'power failure. Small craft may break moorings. A Category 2 '
                'cyclone\'s strongest winds are DESTRUCTIVE winds with '
                'typical gusts over open flat land of 68 - 89 kt. '
            ),
            'fatality_rate': None,
            'displacement_rate': 0.06,
            'numeric_default_min': {
                unit_knots['key']: 67,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 34,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 77,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 126
            },
            'numeric_default_max': {
                unit_knots['key']: 90,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 47,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 103,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 167
            },
            'string_defaults': ['cat 2', 'category 2'],
            'citations': [
                {
                    'text': tr(
                        'Displacement rate is a generalized estimate ('
                        'personal communication Craig Arthur)'),
                    'link': u'https://github.com/inasafe/inasafe/issues/3762'
                            u'#issuecomment-283839365'
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            'key': 'category_1',
            'value': 1,
            'color': yellow,
            'name': tr('Category 1 (tropical cyclone)'),
            'affected': True,
            'description': tr(
                'Negligible house damage. Damage to some crops, trees and '
                'caravans. Craft may drag moorings. A Category 1 cyclone\'s '
                'strongest winds are GALES with typical gusts over open '
                'flat land of 49 - 67 kt. '
            ),
            'fatality_rate': None,
            'displacement_rate': 0.0,
            'numeric_default_min': {
                unit_knots['key']: 49,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 24,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 56,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 90
            },
            'numeric_default_max': {
                unit_knots['key']: 67,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 34,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 77,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 126
            },
            'string_defaults': ['cat 1', 'category 1'],
            'citations': [
                {
                    'text': tr(
                        'Displacement rate is a generalized estimate ('
                        'personal communication Craig Arthur)'),
                    'link': u'https://github.com/inasafe/inasafe/issues/3762'
                            u'#issuecomment-283839365'
                }
            ]
        },
        {
            'key': 'tropical_depression',
            'value': 0,
            'color': green,
            'name': tr('Tropical Depression'),
            'affected': False,
            'description': tr(
                'A tropical depression is a tropical disturbance, that has a '
                'clearly defined surface circulation, which has maximum '
                'sustained winds of less than 34 kt.'),
            'fatality_rate': None,
            'displacement_rate': 0.0,
            'numeric_default_min': 0,
            'numeric_default_max': {
                unit_knots['key']: 49,
                unit_metres_per_second['key']: 24,
                unit_miles_per_hour['key']: 56,
                unit_kilometres_per_hour['key']: 90
            },
            'string_defaults': ['tropical depression', 'no', 'false'],
            'citations': [
                {
                    'text': tr(
                        'Displacement rate is a generalized estimate ('
                        'personal communication Craig Arthur)'),
                    'link': u'https://github.com/inasafe/inasafe/issues/3762'
                            u'#issuecomment-283839365'
                }
            ]
        },
    ],
    'exposures': [
        exposure_land_cover,
        exposure_place,
        exposure_population,
        exposure_road,
        exposure_structure
    ],
    'classification_unit': tr('cyclone category')
}

safe/gui/tools/wizard/wizard_strings.py

Define the questions for the wizard:

cyclone_kilometres_per_hour_question = tr('wind speed in km/h')
cyclone_miles_per_hour_question = tr('wind speed in mph')
cyclone_knots_question = tr('wind speed in kn')

safe/definitions/hazard.py

Finally define new hazard and add it to the hazard_all list:

hazard_cyclone = {
    'key': 'cyclone',
    'name': tr('Cyclone'),
    'description': tr(
        'A Tropical Cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system '
        'characterised by a low-pressure centre, a closed low-level '
        'atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement '
        'of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. It is also referred '
        'to as hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean or typhoon '
        'in the North West Pacific Ocean.'),
    'notes': [
        {
            'item_category': 'cyclone_general',
            'item_header': tr('cyclone general notes'),
            'item_list': [  # additional generic notes for flood - IF has more
                tr('The analysis performed here only considers the impact '
                   'of severe winds from tropical cyclones. The impact '
                   'of other associated hazards (storm surge inundation, '
                   'flood) must be analysed separately.'),
                caveat_simulation,
                caveat_local_conditions,
                caveat_analysis_extent,
            ]
        }
    ],
    'continuous_notes': [  # notes specific to continuous data
        tr(
            'Continuous data are normally used to represent the gust wind '
            'speed of the cyclone, representing the 10-m above ground wind '
            'speed.'
        )
    ],
    'classified_notes': [  # notes specific to classified data
        tr('Classified cyclone hazard data is not presently supported.')
    ],
    'single_event_notes': [  # notes specific to single event data
    ],
    'multi_event_notes': [  # notes specific to multi event data
    ],
    'actions': [  # these are additional generic actions

    ],
    'citations': [
        {
            'text': None,
            'link': None
        }
    ],
    'continuous_hazard_units': [
        unit_miles_per_hour,
        unit_kilometres_per_hour,
        unit_knots,
        unit_metres_per_second
    ],
    'allowed_geometries': [
        'polygon',
        'raster'
    ],
    'classifications': [
        cyclone_au_bom_hazard_classes,
        cyclone_sshws_hazard_classes,
        generic_hazard_classes
    ],
    'compulsory_fields': [hazard_value_field],
    'fields': hazard_fields,
    'extra_fields': [],
    'field_groups': [],
    'layer_modes': [layer_mode_classified, layer_mode_continuous],
    'disabled_exposures': [
        exposure_road
    ]
}

Finally define new hazard and add it to the hazard_all list:

hazard_all = [
    hazard_flood,
    hazard_tsunami,
    hazard_earthquake,
    hazard_volcano,
    hazard_volcanic_ash,
    hazard_cyclone,
    hazard_generic,
    hazard_dam_break
]